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2020Talks

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PNS Daily Newscast - November 27, 2020. 


A call on state congressional delegations to speed COVID-19 economic relief; a gap in trapping pollution impacts communities of color.


2020Talks - November 25, 2020 


CORRECTED 2:30pm MST 11/25 - Linda Thomas-Greenfield would be the second Black woman in US UN Ambassador role, Susan Rice was the first. Biden nominees speak; how can social media spread less misinformation and be less polarizing. *2020Talks will not be released 11/26 & 11/27*

Public News Service - WA: Oceans

Researchers and others believe breaching the four Lower Snake River dams could give Puget Sound orcas more fish to feed on. (Seabamirum/Flickr)

SPOKANE, Wash. – As the public weighs in today in Spokane on the future of the Lower Snake River dams, researchers are calling for their removal in order to save Puget Sound orcas. In October, two members of the J pod of Southern Resident killer whales died, and scientists at the Center for

The EPA has until November to finalize new rules, known as fish consumption rules, for water quality standards in Washington. (pixabay)

SEATTLE - A U.S. federal judge has told the EPA it must finalize new water-quality rules aimed at making Washington state waters cleaner. The rules are known as fish consumption rules because they must ensure that fish caught in Washington state waters are safe to eat. Last year, the EPA said Washin

Health officials have temporarily closed Puget Sound beaches to recreational shellfish harvesting. (Mike Fernwood/Flickr)

SEATTLE - The Washington State Department of Health has closed beaches along the Puget Sound to recreational shellfish harvesting. Health officials issued the closure after finding elevated levels of Diarrhetic Shellfish Poison or DSP, a naturally-occurring biotoxin, in areas ranging from Bellingha

The Southern Resident orca population is making its way to the inland waters of western Washington. (Robert Pittman/NOAA)

SEATTLE – June is Orca Awareness Month, the time of year when killer whales return to the inland waters of western Washington. The endangered residents of Northwest orca pods face a number of threats, the most severe being a shortage of food, which is mainly Chinook salmon. "Our efforts ar

A big crowd turned out Jan. 5 for the hearing on the Tesoro-Savage oil-shipping terminal. (Maddie Foutch)

SEATTLE - The year is only a week old, and it's already a big one for opponents of the oil-shipping terminals proposed in the state. They're counting as a "win" the news that the Renewable Energy Group says its future plans won't include handling crude oil at the terminal it purchased in Grays Harb

PHOTO: An aerial view of Terminal Five at the Port of Seattle shows the location at the heart of a lawsuit filed on Monday to stop oil drilling ships from being docked and repaired in Puget Sound. Photo courtesy of the Port of Seattle.

SEATTLE - It's turning out to be a big week for oil transport issues in Washington. On Monday, four conservation groups filed a lawsuit in King County Superior Court, challenging the Port of Seattle's decision to allow oil drilling ships to be housed and repaired at the port's Terminal Five. Becky

PHOTO: Divers Crayton Fenn and Eric Hazelton with their most recent

SEATTLE - Puget Sound may have a lot of problems in terms of pollution, but a cure is well under way for one of them. In the last year, about 200 lost or abandoned fishing nets have been rounded up by teams of expert divers. It's slow going, because it is no small task to locate the nets by sonar an

PHOTO: Ariel view of Grays Harbor. Photo Credit: Quinault Indian Nation

SEATTLE - Tens of millions of barrels a year: that's how much crude oil is projected to be rolling by rail to Washington state under a proposal that's being challenged by local tribes and community groups. According to Tyson Johnston, First Councilman with the Quinault Indian Nation, his tribe wan

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