Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 7, 2020 


The U.S. Supreme Court rules against rogue 2016 Electoral College voters; SBA pandemic aid goes to companies that don't pledge to save or create jobs.

2020Talks - July 7, 2020 


Biden's climate change task force is making some progress; a federal judge orders the Dakota Access Pipeline shut down; and today sees elections in NJ and DE.

Public News Service - WA: Oceans

PHOTO: A train loaded with coal on the Bellingham tracks, near homes and Boulevard Park. Photo credit: Paul K. Anderson
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BELLINGHAM, Wash. - The process for putting a new rail shipping terminal on the Washington coast isn't exactly clipping along like a fast-moving train. It could take years to do the environmental studies and more years to build the Gateway Pacific Terminal now proposed for Whatcom County. In the mea

LONG BEACH, Wash. - After the colorful Fourth of July fireworks have faded from the night sky, they're not really gone - not if you count the leftover plastic that litters beaches, lawns and fields across the state. A Washington group urges people to think about that as they select their fireworks.

SEATTLE - Washington fishermen and sportsmen are expected to crowd a hearing in Seattle today to consider an area 1,600 miles away - Alaska's Bristol Bay - and voice concerns about a proposal for what would be the largest open-pit mine in North America. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) say

SEATTLE - Starting this month, more than 314,000 chinook salmon are expected to make their way up the Columbia River - an impressive spring return, if it happens. However, the actual numbers often end up being very different than the early projections, and last year, none of the salmon stock returns

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Just when it looked as though the state of Washington was getting tougher on the problem of polluted stormwater runoff, some lawmakers are trying to make it easier for the state to back off. Multiple bills and amendments would allow builders to delay or avoid using newer, low-impac

SEATTLE - You may not think of seeds when you think of oysters, but that's what oyster larvae are, and local fishermen are seeing a major increase in the death toll of these seed oysters. The first sign of trouble, says Bill Dewey, policy and communications director for Taylor Shellfish Farms, was

SEATTLE - The public can comment beginning today on new stormwater permit rules in Washington. The rules govern how subdivisions and buildings are constructed to minimize runoff, the largest source of toxic pollution in lakes, rivers and Puget Sound. The Washington Department of Ecology has been cr

SEATTLE - A weekend at the beach doesn't sound nearly as inviting when the beach is contaminated with untreated sewage, but that's the case at some spots in Washington State. A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) ranks the state 14th in the country for water quality at its b

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