Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 14, 2019 


Hundreds of companies urge Trump to resolve tariff dispute with China. Also on our Friday rundown: California moves closer to universal health coverage. Plus, new Gulf restoration projects – a decade after the Deepwater Horizon spill.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Poverty

Four in 10 Americans say they couldn't cover an unexpected expense of $400. (TatianaMara/Twenty20)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Debt is a major challenge for some Washington families, and measures moving through the Legislature could give them a bit of relief. House Bill 1602 would cap the interest rate companies can charge on consumer debt collection after winning a court judgment at 9 percent. The

A federal grant program funds after-school and summer opportunities such as this one in White Salmon for nearly 18,000 Washington kids. (School's Out Washington)

SEATTLE — For the third year in a row, the Trump administration has proposed eliminating funding for after-school and summer-learning programs. President Donald Trump's proposed 2020 budget cuts funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program by $1.2 billion. In the past, Tru

Raul Hidalgo, who has been taking care of his brother for more than two decades, says he must sometimes pay out of his own pocket for medical expenses. (SEIU 775)

OLYMPIA, Wash. - Health-care and anti-poverty advocates are pushing for the state to fix Medicaid qualifications for folks with long-term care needs. The solution could aid seniors and people with disabilities, as well as caregivers. The change would increase the threshold at which people pay for t

The Washington state Senate holds a public hearing today (Thursday) in Olympia on a bill to create a state tax credit for low-income workers. (Jon Stahl/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Washington state lawmakers are looking at a tax-credit proposal that would address a state tax code that's unbalanced. The Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy recently called the Evergreen State's tax system the "most regressive in the nation," with the lowest income w

More than half of Washington state child care centers had unfilled positions in 2018, according to research. (darby/Twenty20)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Washington state lawmakers are laying out plans to make child care more affordable and accessible. The Child Care Access Now Act sets out a few goals for the state, aiming to establish universal access to child care for all families by 2025 and cap expenses at 7 percent of a

Food banks in Washington state are filling the gap for everyone from federal employees to small business owners in communities outside national parks. (Paul Joseph Brown/Northwest Harvest)

SEATTLE – Food banks across the state are feeling the stress as the government shutdown brings more people through their doors. Thomas Reynolds is the CEO of Northwest Harvest, which distributes to a network of 375 food banks statewide. As an example of the strain, he notes the White Center

Prescription drugs account for nearly a quarter of Washington state's health care spending. (christinacorso/Twenty20)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Could 2019 be the year Washington state lawmakers tackle the rising cost of prescription drugs? State Rep. June Robinson, D-Everett, and Sen. Karen Keiser, D-Kent, are introducing bills this session that would increase transparency for drug pricing. Prescription drugs accoun

Washington STEM and its partners want to triple the number of under-represented students in STEM fields by 2030. (Washington STEM)

SEATTLE – How will Washington state diversify its workforce as technology radically changes the jobs landscape? One answer is investment in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, education for underserved students. By 2030, two-thirds of family-sustaining job openings in the E

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