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PNS Daily Newscast - June 17, 2019 


Trump once again floats the idea of being president beyond two terms. Also on the Monday rundown: A new national report ranks children's well-being, from coast to coast; and a Family Care Act gains support.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Community Issues and Volunteering

Food banks in Washington state are filling the gap for everyone from federal employees to small business owners in communities outside national parks. (Paul Joseph Brown/Northwest Harvest)

SEATTLE – Food banks across the state are feeling the stress as the government shutdown brings more people through their doors. Thomas Reynolds is the CEO of Northwest Harvest, which distributes to a network of 375 food banks statewide. As an example of the strain, he notes the White Center

The most powerful tornado to hit Washington state in more than 30 years leveled some homes on the Kitsap Peninsula. (Kitsap County Sheriff’s Office)

PORT ORCHARD, Wash. – A rare tornado touched down in western Washington last week, causing devastation and heartache for Port Orchard residents just before the holidays. Now, community members and groups, including Kitsap County credit unions, are pulling together to support those affected.

Families of Bellingham men detained in an August ICE raid are getting support from the organization Raid Relief to Reunite Families. (RRRF)

BELLINGHAM, Wash. – After an immigration raid in August that resulted in the detention of Bellingham construction workers, the community is stepping up to help affected families. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents picked up 16 employees of Granite Precast at home or on their way

At last year's supply drive, students were given fake money to buy school supplies. (Inspirus Credit Union)

SPOKANE, Wash. – The high cost of school supplies could be on the minds of many Washington families as students head back to class. One credit union is stepping up to help in a big way. A Deloitte survey finds households expect to spend more than $500 going into the 2018 school year, with mo

A big jump in housing costs has coincided with the growing issue of homelessness in Washington state. (Kid Clutch/Flickr)

SEATTLE — A person earning minimum wage would have to work 75 hours a week to afford a one-bedroom apartment in Washington state. That's according to the new report, "Out of Reach: The High Cost of Housing." The annual analysis of the rental market found Washingtonians would need to earn nea

The 1968 sanitation workers' strike in Memphis attracted the attention of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (iam2018.org)

OLYMPIA, Wash. — Union members across the country are honoring two sanitation workers killed in Memphis 50 years ago today with a moment of silence. Leading up to the deaths of Echol Cole and Robert Walker, workers had complained about unsafe conditions, but were ignored. Their deaths led to

Frequent and thorough hand washing is critical to prevent the spread of viruses like the flu. (gentle07/Pixabay)

SEATTLE – How sick is sick enough to stay home from school or work? With so many obligations, the decision can be tough, but it's also vitally important during flu season. Already, 20 people have died from the flu in Washington state this season, according to health officials. Dr. Angie

A massive raid that was planned for September, known as

SEATTLE -- Here in Washington and across the nation, civil rights and immigrants' advocacy groups are suing over the federal government's refusal to fulfill a Freedom of Information Act request about a recently planned immigration raid. In September, immigrant groups obtained details of "Operation

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