Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - October 16, 2018 


President Trump tours hurricane damage parts of Florida: Also on the Tuesday rundown: we examine the question, is the U.S. spending too much to guard confederate cemeteries; plus the spotlight is on mental wellness during National Children’s Health Month.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WI: Animal Welfare

Piping plovers are territorial and don't nest close together, but often spread out across a long stretch of beach. (Wikimedia Commons)

MADISON, Wis. – Bird enthusiasts and conservation groups say the Trump administration's plans to change the Endangered Species Act would make it more difficult to recover threatened or endangered birds. The proposal, announced last week by the Interior and Commerce departments, would end the

Hunters killed 654 wolves during three consecutive hunting seasons in Wisconsin when they were taken off the endangered species list according to DNR. (Pixabay)

MADISON, Wis. – For the first time in a quarter-century the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is seeing a slow down in the population growth of wolves in the state. The recent release of this year's wolf count shows there are between 905 and 944 wolves in the state. That's about a 2

Wisconsin residents who live near this national forest say the state's bear hunt is diminishing the recreational value of public lands. (USDA photo)

MADISON, Wis. – A number of environmental groups, including the Endangered Species Coalition, want to keep hunters who use packs of dogs out of public lands in Wisconsin, including the state's national forests. The groups say the hunters and their dogs have made the public lands inhospitable

People are successfully coexisting with wolves, says a Wisconsin conservationist, who opposes changes to the Endangered Species Act. (AFP/Getty Images)

MADISON, Wis. – With talk in Washington about changing or reforming the Endangered Species Act, a Wisconsin wolf expert says this is not the time for a change. Melissa Smith of Madison, who is the Great Lakes wolf coordinator for the Endangered Species Coalition, points to a success story in

Urban heat islands, such as the city of Madison, affect the growing season and wildlife, according to a new University of Wisconsin study. (UW-William Graf)

MADISON, Wis. -- Urban-dwelling plants typically get a head start on the growing season compared with their rural counterparts because of the urban heat-island effect, which causes cities to be warmer than the surrounding countryside. According to researcher Samuel Zipper of the University of Wisco

Environmentalists say many of Wisconsin's small, clean streams are drying up because of high-capacity wells used to provide water for huge factory farms. (USGS-WI)

COLOMA, Wis. - As some of the lakes and streams in central Wisconsin are being drawn down or even disappearing, environmentalists are urging the Department of Natural Resources to exercise caution in approving high-capacity wells. The wells typically are used to provide water for the large factor

With fishing season now open in Wisconsin, environmentalists are warning about the danger of mercury contamination and the need to curb it. (travelwisconsin.com)

MADISON, Wis. - Now that the first week of fishing season is here in Wisconsin, the Department of Natural Resources and the state's largest environmental organization, Clean Wisconsin, are warning anglers to be mindful of the dangers of mercury contamination in game fish. Every inland body of water

PHOTO: Experts say the big cat on the loose in Milwaukee is probably an African lion cub, which may have been someone's pet. Credit: Kevin Pluck/Flickr.

WAUWAUTOSA, Wis. – As the search for the Milwaukee Lion – or whatever it is that's roaming neighborhoods on the north side of Milwaukee – moves into its second week, the incident is illustrating Wisconsin's lack of any laws regarding private ownership of wild animals. Melissa Tedr

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