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PNS Daily Newscast - July 3, 2020 


Economists say coronavirus disaster declarations may be the quickest path to reopening; militia groups use virus, Independence Day to recruit followers.

2020Talks - July 3, 2020 


Trump visits South Dakota's Black Hills, Mt. Rushmore today; nearby tribal leaders object, citing concerns over COVID-19 and a fireworks display. Plus, voter registration numbers are down from this time in 2016.

Public News Service - WI: Sustainable Agriculture

Supporters of conservation practices, such as cover crops, are hoping to convince more farmers to incorporate them into their operations as market challenges persist. (Adobe Stock)

FOND DU LAC, Wis. -- Wisconsin farmers aren't immune to changing weather patterns affecting the Midwest. That's why those who are adopting conservation practices hope other farmers follow suit. The National Climate Assessment said heavy downpours and flooding are among the biggest climate-change t

Some scientists predict that the Midwest will be nearly 10 degrees warmer by the middle or end of this century, a shift that could have devastating impacts on farmers. (Adobe Stock)

EAST TROY, Wis. -- Several farm organizations have launched a grassroots movement in hopes of seeing federal action on climate change -- and they're urging Wisconsin farmers to take part. Member groups of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition are circulating an online letter in English and

Licenses to hemp growers in Wisconsin grew from about 250 in 2018 to 1,400 in 2019. (StockPhotoPro/Adobe Stock)

EAST TROY, Wis. – An event in southern Wisconsin is offering tips to farmers interested in the booming business of hemp. The Michael Fields Agricultural Institute is hosting the Industrial Hemp Production Field Day next month to showcase different growing methods for hemp that is high in a c

Cover crops could help prevent fallow syndrome, which can decrease crop yield. (U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr)

MADISON, Wis. – Wisconsin farmers are struggling after wet and cold weather this spring and summer. Jim Stute, research director at the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, says farmers should consider cover crops to alleviate some of the pain. Stute points out the state has a lot of pre

Small grains such as barley and rye help reduce nutrient runoff on farms. (Halee Wepking/Meadowlark Farm)

RIDGEWAY, Wis. — An event at the end of June is highlighting the important role small grains play in Wisconsin. From Grain to Plate Field Day will take place June 30 on Meadowlark Farm in southwest Wisconsin. The aim is to bring growers, processors and consumers together to explore why grains

Through Roots to Glory Tours, American chefs traveled to Benin and Togo to explore their cuisine. (Devon Hamilton/Michael Fields Agricultural Institute)

MADISON, Wis. – There's a connection between African cooking and the United States. Devon Hamilton, associate policy director with the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, recently returned from the West African countries of Benin and Togo and will share what he's learned at a Madison-area

Wisconsin farmers should feel good about the new farm bill, according to one agricultural analyst. (Michael Pereckas/Flickr)

MADISON, Wis. – How did sustainable agriculture fare in the 2018 Farm Bill? One analyst breaks down the wins and losses. Margaret Krome, policy director for the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, says the bill provides baseline funding for beginning farmers and local food programs. It

Wisconsin has the seventh most hemp-planted land in the country. (Maja Dumat/Flickr)

MADISON, Wis. – President Donald Trump is scheduled to sign the Farm Bill Thursday, setting the hemp industry up for a major breakthrough in 2019. Hemp will no longer be classified as a Schedule I controlled substance, opening up possibilities for farmers in Wisconsin and other states. Bad

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