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PNS Daily Newscast - May 23, 2019 


Unsealed warrants show more than 1,000 phone and text contacts between Michael Cohen and a Russian business post-Election Day. Also on our Thursday rundown: More teachers moonlight due to low wages. Plus, get ready for Great Lakes Restoration phase three.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Environment

Construction has started on the controversial Rockwool insulation manufacturing plant. (Brent Walls, Upper Potomac Riverkeeper)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The Legislature will consider expanding tax breaks around the target="parent">controversial Rockwool project. Opponents say that will hurt the quality of life in the West Virginia county with the lowest unemployment. The insulation-manufacturing plant under construction

Some health researchers have tied mountaintop-removal coal mining to much higher rates of cancer in people living nearby. (Stockman/Southwings)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A health study of mountaintop-removal mining – and a moratorium until it's finished – are getting a hearing in Congress. Opponents say this could end Appalachian surface mining, but critics of this type of mining claim it has buried 4,000 miles of streams over

West Virginia thermal-coal production has declined steadily for years, and market forces suggest no turnaround is likely. (Hangela/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The West Virginia Legislature has passed a 40 percent cut in thermal coal severance taxes, despite Revenue Department predictions that it would do little to change steam coal's steady decline. The long-term outlook is no better, said Carey King, a research scientist and assistan

According to the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee, countries with mountaintop removal mines have a more than 40 percent higher rates of birth defects. (Vivian Stockman/OVEC/Southwings)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The new Democratic leadership in Congress is investigating why the Department of the Interior stopped a major study of the health impacts of mountaintop removal and other surface mines. After researchers found much higher rates of cancer, birth defects and other health pr

Dominion is now telling regulators in Virginia that it expects demand for electricity from natural gas to stay essentially flat for the next decade and a half. (Utility filings/IEEFA)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The demand the huge Atlantic Coast Pipeline was intended to meet is disappearing, according to documents from the corporations behind the project. Dominion and Duke Energy own almost all of the pipeline, as well as the electric utilities it would supply with natural gas.

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., is on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr)

WHEELING, W.Va. - With the help of a U.S. senator from West Virginia, Andrew Wheeler's nomination to head the Environmental Protection Agency is moving to the full Senate for a vote. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., is among those who had questioned Wheeler's stance on clean-water standards for

Routine updates to water-pollution standards are proving controversial in the West Virginia Legislature, with objections coming from some manufacturers. (Homestage/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — Under pressure from a specific Charleston manufacturer, a state Senate committee has moved to delay updating human health criteria in water-quality rules. Clean-water advocates hope for more support in the House. The most recent step in the back-and-forth on water-pollut

The chemicals C8 (used to make Teflon) and MCHM (used to clean coal) have caused problems when they have shown up in West Virginia tap water. (suju/Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- A normally boring rule-making process is turning into a water fight for lawmakers. At the request of the West Virginia Manufacturers Association, the state Department of Environmental Protection shelved three years of work updating nearly 100 water-quality standards on potential

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