Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - May 17, 2019 


West Coast immigrants' rights groups pan President Trump’s new immigration proposal as “elitist.” Also on the Friday rundown: Consumer advocates want stronger energy-efficiency standards. And we'll take you to a state that ranks near the bottom for senior mental health.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Human Rights/Racial Justice

The Republican-controlled West Virginia Legislature is moving forward with voter-ID legislation. (West Virginia Legislature)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The Republican-controlled House of Delegates looks likely to pass a "voter ID" bill, and critics charge it's intended to suppress West Virginia's already low turnout. House Bill 4013 passed the Judiciary Committee on a party-line vote and is expected to clear the House today. It

A bill to be introduced at the Legislature would create a way for nonviolent felons to ask the court to give them a clean record after five years without getting in trouble. Photo by the WV state legislature.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - No matter how they live after being convicted, West Virginia felons have a hard time getting a job. But legislation could change that for some nonviolent former offenders. Kanawha County Delegate Mike Pushkin will sponsor his Second Chance for Employment Act again in the next

PHOTO: As West Virginia lawmakers prepare for the legislative session, it looks unlikely that a change of control in both House and Senate will derail Gov. Tomblin's push to reform the state's juvenile justice system. Photo credit: Richard Ross, courtesy of Annie E. Casey Foundation.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Control of the West Virginia Legislature may have changed, but juvenile-justice reform still seems likely. It's one of Governor Earl Ray Tomblin's big initiatives for the year, and the long-time Senate president usually gets his proposals though the Legislature. At a Thursday ev

PHOTO: The shooting of unarmed teen Micheal Brown in Ferguson, Missouri has sparked interest in a new Mobile Justice smartphone app which allows users to document and report interactions with police. Image courtesy of ACLU of Missouri.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - The shooting of Micheal Brown in Ferguson, Missouri has sparked interest in a smartphone app designed to help people protect their rights. Missouri American Civil Liberties Union executive director Jeffrey Mittman says their Mobile Justice smartphone app explains what proper pol

GRAPHIC: Organizers say next week's Summit on Race Matters in Appalachia in Charleston is an opportunity to take a calm, serious look at questions that are too often either ignored or inflamed.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A summit on race relations coming Monday and Tuesday to Charleston offers a chance for a deep, civilized look at something that matters, according to its organizers. Issues of bias typically are either ignored or inflamed, unquestioned or tangled in controversy, said the Rev. Ro

PHOTO: A Governor's task force offers real promise of reforming West Virginia's juvenile justice system, according to a mother appointed to the group. Picture by Richard Ross, courtesy of the Annie E Casey foundation.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A governor's task force on West Virginia juvenile justice could bring badly needed progress on the issue, according to one mother involved in the process. Kathy Jo Smith of Barbour County was appointed to the group after her son served more than a year for trying to break into a

PHOTO: Many say West Virginia's history has been in part defined by African-American history, starting with the role of slavery in the civil war, but later including early integration in the coalfields. Photo from the Library of Congress.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – As West Virginia celebrates its 150th birthday, a series of events will highlight how African-American history is central to the state’s story. The Rev. Ron English of Charleston says the state might not even exist if everyone had accepted slavery. He says the fron

PHOTO: Much of the debate about immigration reform centers on its impact on working conditions and the job market. Photo of a pro-reform rally courtesy of Interfaith Worker Justice.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - In West Virginia and elsewhere, some U.S. citizens say they're worried that immigration reform could mean more competition for jobs. But clergy members who serve undocumented workers say what's more likely is that migrants' jobs would be forced closer to American standards. Acc

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