Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - June 26, 2019 


Mueller to testify in open session; migrant children returned to troubled detention center; plus ending the school-to-prison pipeline, and seeking justice for Native Americans killed at Wounded Knee.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Rural/Farming

Food activists such as Bradley Wilson fear a new bill intended to require that SNAP benefits only be used for more healthy options could have unintended consequences on places such as farmers' markets. (WVFOODLINK)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A bill at the Legislature to require food benefits be used for healthy options could have unintended consequences - including maybe making it harder for some low-income folks to shop at farmers' markets. Senate Bill 626 is intended to require that Supplemental Nutrition Assistan

A legal push is underway to force the EPA to close a sizable loophole in the regulation of hazardous waste from oil and gas drilling. Credit: Bill Hughes/Earthworks.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The EPA has largely failed to regulate waste from oil and gas drilling, even though the agency admitted the hazardous nature of the waste decades ago. National and state-based groups are pushing for the agency to at last close the gap. Twenty-seven years ago, the EPA decla

A National Wildlife Federation poll shows hunters and anglers are willing to put aside their political differences in support of greater EPA protections for clean water, including small headwaters and wetlands. Photo courtesy of Trout Unlimited.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A national poll of hunters and anglers has found overwhelming support – even among conservatives – for what has been a controversial Environmental Protection agency clean water policy. The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) commissioned the survey. It found m

The Obama administration plan to cut emissions at coal-fired power plants would affect 11 plants in West Virginia. Conservationists are hailing the move, while the coal industry and its allies are threatening legal challenges. Photo credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – President Obama has finalized plans to reduce carbon emissions from existing power plants by 32 percent by 2030. Conservationists say the EPA's Clean Power Plan, which targets older, coal-fired plants, will have immense health benefits and boost clean energy efforts in the

PHOTO: The EPA's new rule clarifies which waterways are covered by the Clean Water Act. Conservation groups in West Virginia think it could be especially important for rural areas. Photo courtesy West Virginia Dept. of Tourism.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – The Obama administration has released a new rule clarifying which waterways are covered by the Clean Water Act. Many West Virginia conservationists say it's a promising step. Two court decisions have, in a sense, muddied the waters about which protections apply to a numbe

PHOTO: A witness who had to flee Monday's huge train derailment and explosion in West Virginia says it has changed how he looks at rail shipment of crude oil. Photo courtesy Office of Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — A witness who fled Monday's train derailment and massive fire says he can't help but wonder now if he and his neighbors are safe from trains carrying crude oil. Iraq War veteran Brandon Truman lives in Boomer, W. Va., directly across the river from where the tanker cars e

CHART: It's unclear how often deeper Marcellus fracking wells interact with the hundreds of thousands of other wells that have been drilled in West Virginia. Chart of a fracking well courtesy U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - In West Virginia's natural gas boom, a potential concern is what might happen when the maze of underground wells intersect. There have been three documented cases of deep Marcellus drilling and high-pressure fracking connecting with older wells. Given the hyundreds of thousands

PHOTO: West Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture Walt Helmick says a small program at the agency is helping veterans become beekeepers on old surface mine land. Photo by Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - With a little help from the state, a few veterans have some old surface mines abuzz with a new kind of activity. A year-old program by the West Virginia Department of Agriculture is helping vets set up beehives and raise honey on old mine land. Agriculture Commissioner Walt H

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