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PNS Daily Newscast - August 3, 2020 


Negotiations to resume today on a COVID-19 relief package; advocates brace for surge in homeless Americans.


2020Talks - August 3, 2020 


Concerns about U.S. Postal Service delays and voter intimidation from voting rights advocates. Plus, Joe Biden calls for emergency housing legislation.

Public News Service - WV: Water

A federal judge ruled that Bluestone Coal Corp. will have to pay penalties and cleanup costs for leaking selenium from mines into McDowell County streams. (Wikimedia Commons)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - After a group of environmental activists filed a lawsuit last year, a federal judge ruled this week that a coal company owned by the family of West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice is liable for selenium pollution discharged into waters near one of its coal mines. Bluestone Coal Corpo

An investigation by Rolling Stone magazine found the waste brine from Marcellus wells is radioactive enough to be seen as a threat to workers and the public. (Vivian Stockman/Ohio Valley Environmental Coalition)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. -- A federal loophole means millions of tons and billions of gallons of radioactive natural gas waste are being disposed of as if they were not radioactive. According to the investigation by Rolling Stone, liquid brine from the average Marcellus well contains more than 9,000 pic

PFAS chemicals can pollute areas when runoff from factories enters rivers and streams. (Adobe Stock)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - Come next month's 2020 legislative session, West Virginia lawmakers will propose a rare piece of legislation to improve drinking-water standards across the state. Led by Delegate Evan Hansen of Monongalia, a group of Democrats aims to regulate the levels of PFAS chemicals in wa

A West Virginia community is solving a clean tap-water crisis with hydropanels that make water out of air. (Zero Mass Water)

KIMBALL, W.Va. – In McDowell County, West Virginia, access to clean tap water is a challenge for many. That's why one community is trying something different: a new technology called "hydropanels." Linda McKinney, who heads the Five Loaves and Two Fishes Food Bank in Kimball, joined with man

Some West Virginia residents are facing a polluted water crisis partly from industrial runoff. (Adobe stock)

KIMBALL, W.Va. — More than 2 million Americans live without running water and basic indoor plumbing, according to a new report by water access group DigDeep. The report finds lack of clean water hits vulnerable communities in the country particularly hard, including the Navajo Nation in the So

Two-thirds of West Virginia counties rank in the bottom third for their number of tap-water safety violations; even more are in the bottom third for the time it takes to fix these issues. (Natural Resources Defense Council)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The latest report on unsafe tap water confirms some of West Virginia's drinking water problems - and puts them in a national context. According to the "Watered Down Justice" survey by the Natural Resources Defense Council, two-thirds of West Virginia counties rate poorly fo

Supporters argue a storage hub for ethane from natural gas would be key to developing a petrochemical industry that could produce consumer plastics in the northern Ohio Valley. (DOE)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – West Virginia conservation groups are fighting a plan to use U.S. Department of Energy clean power funds for a huge petrochemical project. The state's congressional delegation is pushing for the Appalachian Storage Hub to get $1.9 billion in loan guarantees designated for

Some health researchers have tied mountaintop-removal coal mining to much higher rates of cancer in people living nearby. (Stockman/Southwings)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – A health study of mountaintop-removal mining – and a moratorium until it's finished – are getting a hearing in Congress. Opponents say this could end Appalachian surface mining, but critics of this type of mining claim it has buried 4,000 miles of streams over

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