Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 25, 2018 


The list of accusers against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh continues to swell. Also on the Tuesday rundown: Hurricane Florence SNAPs North Carolina to attention on the importance of food benefits; plus a new report says young parents need better supports.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Children's Issues

Online access can make children seem separated from adults and the world around them. (Pixabay/Sasint)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Tips for parents trying to bridge the modern media gap with their children - that will be one topic of Thursday night's keynote address at the spring conference of the National Association of Social Workers, West Virginia. Licensed social worker and consultant Marcus Stal

Research confirms that not having a good childhood can have a lifelong impact on mental and physical health. (Pixabay/Rudy Anderson)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Childhood trauma is a public health problem, but we can build resilience to its effects - that's the message planned for Wednesday morning's keynote address at the spring conference of the National Association of Social Workers, in West Virginia. Research continues to con

West Virginia spends about 20 percent less on school workers as a proportion of the state's Gross Domestic Product than it did eight years ago. (W. Va. Center on Budget and Policy)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Striking teachers are angry about rising health care premiums and eroding benefits from West Virginia's Public Employee Insurance Agency. But what would a real PEIA fix look like? School workers, who are away from their classrooms for an eighth day today, say they want mo

Thousands of teachers and school employees faced a cold rain to rally for better pay and insurance outside the West Virginia Capitol on Saturday. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia teachers say they'll strike Thursday and Friday over pay and health insurance, and bills likely to pass the legislature look unlikely to prevent a longer walkout. The House and Senate have debated raising teacher pay by 1 percent a year. But according to the

The parents of children who get care through CHIP are watching Congress anxiously. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Without renewed funding from Congress, the West Virginia Children's Health Insurance Program is running on fumes - which is worrying families. At the end of next month, the program will stop new enrollment, a first step in winding down. That's scary for the parents of th

The Annie E. Casey Foundation has just issued an important study of children's well-being in West Virginia and around the country. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - A high proportion of West Virginia children are living in stubbornly persistent poverty, according to a major new study. The Annie E. Casey Foundation's "Race for Results" report looked at a variety of health, education, family stability and income data by state. In West Virgin

Medicaid supports much of the health-care provided in West Virginia schools. (Mary Kuhlman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Health care providers say a Republican bill that includes Medicaid cuts would threaten West Virginia's school health services. Medicaid pays much of the cost for school nurses and therapists here, and for more than 50 school-based community clinics, many in rural areas.

West Virginia lawmakers are considering imposing work requirements on people seeking federal food aid, but many of those people have barriers to employment. (West Virginia Center on Budget And Policy)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. -- Bills to put hurdles in the way of people seeking federal food aid are cruel and counterproductive, say advocates for the poor. Senate Bill 60 and companion House Bill 2132 would put asset tests and possibly work requirements on West Virginians seeking help from the Supplemen

1 of 19 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »