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PNS Daily News - December 11, 2019 


U.S. House to vote on two articles of impeachment; $1.4 trillion in planned oil & gas development said to put the world in "bright red level" of climate crisis; anti-protest legislation moves forward in Ohio; "forest farming" moves forward in Appalachia; and someone's putting cowboy hats on pigeons in Nevada.

2020Talks - December 11, 2019 


18 years ago today, China joined the WTO. Now, China's in a trade war with the U.S. Also, House Democrats and the Trump administration made a deal to move forward with the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement.

Public News Service - WV: Criminal Justice

Supreme Court Justice Brent Benjamin says the state's drug courts, such as this one serving Calhoun and Roane counties, are producing good results. But he says the state has to do more in prevention. Credit: West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - President Obama is discussing West Virginia's drug crisis with folks in Charleston today. One judge working hard on the issue says this is a good time for the state to move from reacting to the problem to better prevention. Supreme Court Justice Brent Benjamin can take a lot of

State lawmakers like Delegate Don Perdue are considering what they would say to President Obama about West Virginia's drug abuse crisis when Obama is in Charleston. Photo by Dan Heyman

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - President Barack Obama will be in Charleston this week, to discuss West Virginia's drug crisis. Wayne County delegate Don Perdue has long worked on the issue and has some thoughts on what he would say to the president. Perdue has tried for years to get the legislature to incre

Anger at incidents such as the Upper Big Branch mine disaster is making criminal prosecutions of CEOs such as Don Blankenship more common. Courtesy: UBB memorial/governor's office.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Coal baron Don Blankenship's high profile trial is coming at a time of anger against corporate wrongdoing, but analysts say that anger still faces entrenched forces that protect executives. Russell Mokhiber, editor of Corporate Crime Reporter, says Blankenship's prosecuti

A bill to be introduced at the Legislature would create a way for nonviolent felons to ask the court to give them a clean record after five years without getting in trouble. Photo by the WV state legislature.

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - No matter how they live after being convicted, West Virginia felons have a hard time getting a job. But legislation could change that for some nonviolent former offenders. Kanawha County Delegate Mike Pushkin will sponsor his Second Chance for Employment Act again in the next

Tina Manns is retiring after 23 years helping domestic violence victims. Credit: Dan Heyman.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – An institution in West Virginia domestic violence prevention is on her way to retiring. After nearly 25 years, Tina Manns is cutting her hours as Boone County Outreach Coordinator for the YWCA Resolve Family Abuse Program. In countless cases, the diminutive, white-haired 8

PHOTO: West Virginia social workers are hopeful about reforms to the state's juvenile justice system. They say new truancy rules and other public school efforts can help keep kids out of jail. Photo credit: Richard Ross, courtesy of Annie E. Casey Foundation.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - West Virginia schools have a key role in reducing the number of kids who end up in jail – and while social workers say preventing truancy is an excellent starting place, its only part of the picture. As the state works to reduce the number of juveniles in the criminal just

PHOTO: Poet Kane Smego is coming to Charleston this week to address a conference of Social Workers. He says says he'll talk about a central part of his work - teaching young people how to use spoken word performances to better understand themselves and others. Photo courtesy of Smego.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Poetry is a tool that can help young people break out of isolation, according to the keynote speaker at a conference of social workers this week. Spoken word artist Kane Smego plans to talk to folks about how it works Wednesday morning during the annual spring conference

PHOTO: West Virginia child abuse survivors who have become public figures, including TV news anchor Greg Carter, are coming forward to talk about what happened to them. Photo credit: Will Laird/West Virginia Child Advocacy Network.

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, and some abuse survivors who have become public figures are coming forward to tell their stories. Stephen Smith, director of the West Virginia Healthy Kids and Families Coalition, says his work is motivated in part by two points: Bad things

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