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PNS Daily Newscast - August 14, 2020 


Trump rebuffs Biden's call for a national mask mandate; nurses warn of risks of in-person school.


2020Talks - August 14, 2020 


Responses to President Trump's suggestion that he opposes more Postal Service funding in part to prevent expanded mail-in voting; and Puerto Rico's second try at a primary on Sunday.

Public News Service - WY: Education

Calls for justice for the killing of Robert Ramirez in Laramie after a 2018 traffic stop have resurfaced in the wake of global protests targeting police violence against people of color. (Becker1999/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- As the nation continues to grapple with police violence against people of color, the ACLU of Wyoming is hosting a virtual community forum on racism this Saturday. The event will take place online via video conference. Antonio Serrano, advocacy manager for the group, said he hopes

Critics of the Bureau of Land Management's move to cut royalty payments worry the action incentivizes oil production during what's been called the biggest oil glut in history. (Matryx/Pixabay)

SHERIDAN, Wyoming -- As Wyoming faces a potential $2.8 billion budget deficit fueled by the COVID-19 crisis, lawmakers are bracing for a significant revenue shortfall after the Trump administration announced cuts for oil and gas royalties on public lands. Shannon Anderson, staff attorney for the P

School food service staff members in Wyoming are shifting gears as classrooms close, and finding creative ways to make sure children don't go hungry during the COVID-19 crisis. (Wyoming Department of Education)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- As Wyoming joins the national effort to protect public health in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis by closing classrooms, school districts are finding creative ways to make sure children who rely on school meals can continue to get healthy, nutritious food. Tamra Jackson, nutrition

Wyoming's retired firefighters, teachers and other public sector workers have lost an estimated 21% of their spending power since the last pension inflation adjustment in 2008. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. -- The cost of health care, groceries and housing has increased dramatically since 2008, the last time Wyoming's retired public employees saw an inflation adjustment in their monthly pension checks, and many are having trouble keeping up. Last week, Wyoming lawmakers passed House Bi

Research shows that youth and young adults who use e-cigarettes are more likely to use other tobacco products, including traditional cigarettes. (NeedPix)

CASPER, Wyo. – Wyoming teens' rising use of e-cigarettes, a relatively new nicotine delivery system also known as vaping, was the central topic at a gathering of health advocates, experts and lawmakers in Casper this week. Vaping has come under increased scrutiny after several deaths were li

Vertical Harvest operates on one-tenth of an acre, yet grows produce at a rate equivalent to a traditional five acre soil farm. (Vertical Harvest)

JACKSON, Wyo. – An indoor vertical farm in Jackson that produces and sells roughly 100,000 pounds of fresh produce annually is powered by a workforce built on the concept of diversity. Nearly two-thirds of Vertical Harvest's workers face disabilities, including autism, Down syndrome or visio

Currently, only 8% of Wyoming families can afford infant care, according to federal affordability standards. (Pixnio)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – A new Economic Policy Institute report shows how hard it is for Wyoming families to pay for early child care and education for one child, let alone two. Zane Mokhiber, a data analyst at the Institute, says most people don't think of infant care as a particular cost burden, w

On average, school districts spend $21,000 to recruit and train a new teacher, but four years after graduation, only 10 percent who enter the profession are still in the classroom. (Woodleywonderworks/Flickr)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – A new report puts a spotlight on the economic stress facing people who choose a career in teaching. Emma Garcia, the report's co-author and economist with the Economic Policy Institute, says 59% of teachers nationwide turn to "moonlighting" or side jobs to supplement their in

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