Newscasts

PNS Daily News - November 22, 2019 


President Trump signs a spending bill to avert a government shutdown; it's deadline day for cities to opt out of a federal opioid settlement; and a new report says unsafe toys still are in stores.

2020Talks - November 22, 2019 


Affordable housing legislation was introduced in Congress yesterday, following the first debate questions about housing. Plus, Israeli PM Bibi Netanyahu was indicted for fraud, bribery, and breach of trust, just days after the Trump administration’s policy greenlighting Israeli settlement of the West Bank. And finally, former NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg continues his slow and steady potential entry into the race.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Water

PHOTO: Jon Goldstein, senior energy policy manager at the Environmental Defense Fund, says every state with oil and gas development should be keeping an eye on Wyoming's move to conduct baseline groundwater testing. Photo courtesy of EDF

CASPER, Wyo. - Wyoming is taking a new approach for oil and gas development that reflects concerns over the groundwater pollution around Pavillion. The Oil and Gas Commission voted Tuesday to set rules for baseline water testing - testing wells around each drilling site before any drilling happens.

PHOTO: Amber Wilson, Environmental Quality Coordinator at the Wyoming Outdoor Council, says those affected by drinking water pollution east of Pavillion need assurances from the state, as it picks up the pollution investigation. Photo courtesy of WOC

LANDER, Wyo. - The "now what?" and "what next?" questions have been floating around since Gov. Matt Mead announced that the state will be in charge of the next phases of investigation about potential drinking-water contamination from hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," east of Pavillion. Mead ann

PHOTO: Paintbrush Canyon in Grand Teton National Park. Grand Teton is a case study in a new report that highlights risks to national parks because of hydraulic fracturing. Photo credit: Sarah Zenner, NPS

MOOSE, Wyo. – Tread carefully when it comes to Grand Teton National Park. That's the gist of a new report from the National Parks Conservation Association that looks at how the hydraulic fracturing boom is creeping closer to park boundaries. Sharon Mader is the Grand Teton program manager

PAVILLION, Wyo. - The best way to find the "smoking gun" is to follow the smoke to the tip of the barrel. A hydrologist makes that point after being hired by environmental groups to review the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) investigation that suggests a connection between hydraulic fracturing

PAVILLION, Wyo. - The Environmental Protection Agency's study of groundwater contamination and links to hydraulic fracturing in Pavillion is the topic of a U.S. House subcommittee hearing today in Washington. No one locally affected was invited to the hearing before the House Energy and Environment

CASPER, Wyo. - Most Wyoming voters think you can protect land and water and have a strong economy at the same time, according to a new poll of attitudes throughout the Rockies. Lori Weigel with the Republican polling firm Public Opinion Strategies also found near-unanimous support among Wyoming vote

LARAMIE, Wyo. - A plan to get much-needed water to Colorado's Front Range has come back to life, although a coalition of 10 conservation groups is hoping it is short-lived. The Flaming Gorge Pipeline proposal is sitting before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, after being dropped by the U.S.

LARAMIE, Wyo. - Wyoming may be poised for a uranium renaissance. The U.S. Interior Department extended a ban on uranium claims around the Grand Canyon last week, and some Colorado projects are tied up in court. Meanwhile, there are 25 projects either up and running or in the process in Wyoming, a st

3 of 6 pages   « First  <  1 2 3 4 5 >  Last »