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PNS Daily News - September 16, 2019 


New allegations emerge against Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh; and a new report says a lightning strike is more likely than a forced arbitration win.

2020Talks - September 16, 2019. (3 min.)  


2020 presidential hopefuls tweet about more sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, and Democrats who didn't make it onto last week's debate stage continue their grassroots approaches.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Water

PHOTO: Amber Wilson, Environmental Quality Coordinator at the Wyoming Outdoor Council, says those affected by drinking water pollution east of Pavillion need assurances from the state, as it picks up the pollution investigation. Photo courtesy of WOC

LANDER, Wyo. - The "now what?" and "what next?" questions have been floating around since Gov. Matt Mead announced that the state will be in charge of the next phases of investigation about potential drinking-water contamination from hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," east of Pavillion. Mead ann

PHOTO: Paintbrush Canyon in Grand Teton National Park. Grand Teton is a case study in a new report that highlights risks to national parks because of hydraulic fracturing. Photo credit: Sarah Zenner, NPS

MOOSE, Wyo. – Tread carefully when it comes to Grand Teton National Park. That's the gist of a new report from the National Parks Conservation Association that looks at how the hydraulic fracturing boom is creeping closer to park boundaries. Sharon Mader is the Grand Teton program manager

PAVILLION, Wyo. - The best way to find the "smoking gun" is to follow the smoke to the tip of the barrel. A hydrologist makes that point after being hired by environmental groups to review the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) investigation that suggests a connection between hydraulic fracturing

PAVILLION, Wyo. - The Environmental Protection Agency's study of groundwater contamination and links to hydraulic fracturing in Pavillion is the topic of a U.S. House subcommittee hearing today in Washington. No one locally affected was invited to the hearing before the House Energy and Environment

CASPER, Wyo. - Most Wyoming voters think you can protect land and water and have a strong economy at the same time, according to a new poll of attitudes throughout the Rockies. Lori Weigel with the Republican polling firm Public Opinion Strategies also found near-unanimous support among Wyoming vote

LARAMIE, Wyo. - A plan to get much-needed water to Colorado's Front Range has come back to life, although a coalition of 10 conservation groups is hoping it is short-lived. The Flaming Gorge Pipeline proposal is sitting before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, after being dropped by the U.S.

LARAMIE, Wyo. - Wyoming may be poised for a uranium renaissance. The U.S. Interior Department extended a ban on uranium claims around the Grand Canyon last week, and some Colorado projects are tied up in court. Meanwhile, there are 25 projects either up and running or in the process in Wyoming, a st

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - The U.S. House is set to make a budget decision this week that could mean less money for Wyoming recreation and tourism projects. The Interior Department budget bill "de-funds" the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), bringing it to its lowest level ever. Neil Thagard, a hunte

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