Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - September 20, 2019 


A whistleblower complaint against President Trump sets off tug-of-war between Congress and the White House; and students around the world strike today to demand action on climate change.

2020Talks - September 20, 2019. (3 min.)  


Climate change is a big issue this election season, and global climate strikes kick off, while UAW labor strikes continue.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Water

Wyoming needs to be more "water-tight." That's the thinking behind discussions about how to stop coalbed methane wastewater from flowing out of state. One proposal includes building a pipeline and storing the water underground until it's needed, although the industry isn't welcoming the idea because

Local residents, conservation groups, hunters and anglers are in Washington this week to support a series of legislative proposals designed to balance recreation, hunting and fishing with new oil and gas development on Wyoming's public lands. The Sportsmen's Public Lands Energy Agenda would ensure a

Climate change caused by humans has received most of the blame for below-normal water conditions and drought in most of Wyoming recently, but there may be another reason, and Mother Nature gets the blame. Matt Jenkins with High Country News has researched climate history in Wyoming and Colorado, and

The Wyoming Environmental Quality Council is weighing in on the debate about where, and how much, coal bed methane discharge water can flow onto nearby land. The council has approved a rule to require scientific proof that "CBM" water is "beneficial" before it can be discharged. Nancy Sorenson is

Wyoming's booming coalbed methane industry has a lot of extra water to get rid of, and very few willing customers. That's because the wastewater leaves a sodium and saline trail wherever it goes, and a farm and ranch group says the Environmental Quality Council should step in to make sure that "salt

Cheyenne, WY - Gold prices have spurred another gold rush in the West, with mines and mine expansions proposed for Wyoming. But there's a new warning that "gold fever" can cause pollution problems for hundreds of years. A new report finds that the hard rock mining industry always promises water will

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