Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 18, 2019 


President Trump invited to testify in person or in writing, says Pelosi; a battle over the worth of rooftop-solar electricity when it's sold back to the grid; the flu gets an early start; and the value of Texas family caregivers.

2020Talks - November 18, 2019 


Former Pres. Barack Obama cautioned Democrats to be more moderate, and incumbent Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards wins over Trump-backed Republican opponent.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Water

Clark, WY – For those who live near the site of a gas well blowout in the Clark area last year, the local water may not be safe to drink, or cook with, or bathe in. Residents are meeting tonight to discuss how an underground plume of contamination from the blowout has affected them. Testing sh

Wyoming needs to be more "water-tight." That's the thinking behind discussions about how to stop coalbed methane wastewater from flowing out of state. One proposal includes building a pipeline and storing the water underground until it's needed, although the industry isn't welcoming the idea because

Local residents, conservation groups, hunters and anglers are in Washington this week to support a series of legislative proposals designed to balance recreation, hunting and fishing with new oil and gas development on Wyoming's public lands. The Sportsmen's Public Lands Energy Agenda would ensure a

Climate change caused by humans has received most of the blame for below-normal water conditions and drought in most of Wyoming recently, but there may be another reason, and Mother Nature gets the blame. Matt Jenkins with High Country News has researched climate history in Wyoming and Colorado, and

The Wyoming Environmental Quality Council is weighing in on the debate about where, and how much, coal bed methane discharge water can flow onto nearby land. The council has approved a rule to require scientific proof that "CBM" water is "beneficial" before it can be discharged. Nancy Sorenson is

Wyoming's booming coalbed methane industry has a lot of extra water to get rid of, and very few willing customers. That's because the wastewater leaves a sodium and saline trail wherever it goes, and a farm and ranch group says the Environmental Quality Council should step in to make sure that "salt

Cheyenne, WY - Gold prices have spurred another gold rush in the West, with mines and mine expansions proposed for Wyoming. But there's a new warning that "gold fever" can cause pollution problems for hundreds of years. A new report finds that the hard rock mining industry always promises water will

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