Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast _ March 31, 2020 


Treasury and IRS say economic impact checks for COVID-19 to begin in next three weeks. And states deal with collision of coronavirus and homelessness.

2020Talks - March 31, 2020 


During the new coronavirus pandemic, many are advocating more mail-in ballots. Some say restricting voting by mail is one method of suppressing the vote.

Public News Service - WY: Environmental Justice

Between 2008 and 2017, more than half of U.S. coal mines closed operations, and dropping costs for renewables make coal a less attractive energy source. (Greg Goebel/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Murray Energy recently became the fifth coal company this year to file for bankruptcy, and Ann Eisenberg, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law, maintains it's past time to have a conversation about creating what has been called a just trans

Coal ash is what's left after burning coal for electricity production, and is typically stored in open air, often unlined slurries. (Richard Webb)

SHERIDAN, Wyo. – The deadline for public comments on PacifiCorp's plans to mitigate toxic leaks from coal ash ponds at power plants in Wyoming is Aug. 26, and environmental groups are urging people to put their opinions on record. Coal ash is the byproduct of coal burned for generating elect

Since 2008, vehicles have killed 45 moose along Wyoming Highway 390. (John J. Mosesso/Wikimedia Commons)

JACKSON HOLE, Wyo. – Teton County commissioners and Jackson Town Council members heard public testimony earlier this week about what should be done to stop the deaths of moose and other wildlife, especially at the intersection of the Teton Pass Highway and Highway 22 along the Snake River corr

The drop in prices for renewable energy could turn almost $1 trillion in natural gas infrastructure investments into stranded assets. (Pexels)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – After looking back at the history of shale gas extraction in the United States, international development and trade experts say hydraulic fracturing should be approached with caution by countries considering ways to meet growing energy demands. Mitch Jones, a senior policy a

A proposed project in Converse County could lead to the extraction of 94 million barrels of oil and 5.8 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. (Pixabay)

CASPER, Wyo. — Conservationists are calling on the Bureau of Land Management to consider air quality and methane waste before green-lighting a project in Converse County that would add some 5,000 new oil and gas wells in eastern Wyoming - an area not currently protected by the same state air p

Friday is the last day for public comments on Wyoming's plans to manage Yellowstone grizzly populations. (USFWS)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Friday is the last day for public comments on Wyoming's plans to manage Yellowstone grizzly populations if the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service takes the bear off the Endangered Species List. The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission plans outline how a hunting season for the bears

Coal companies filing for bankruptcy could put taxpayers on the hook for cleanup costs. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Coal companies filing for bankruptcy could put taxpayers on the hook for cleanup costs. According to analysts, state and federal regulators failed to ensure that self-bonded companies had sufficient and enforceable resources for restoration. Fifty U.S. coal companies have filed for

Women living closer to high levels of green vegetation have lower mortality rates than do women living in less green areas, according to a new report. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. - Women living closer to high levels of green vegetation have lower mortality rates than women living in less green areas, according to new researchfunded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Bonnie Joubert Ph.D.,

1 of 6 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »