Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - March 22, 2019 


President Trump rattles the Middle East, saying the U.S. will recognize Israel’s authority over the Golan Heights. Also on our Friday rundown: A judge blocks laws limiting the power of the new Wisconsin governor. Plus, momentum builds across party lines to abolish the death penalty.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WY: Poverty Issues

Just 29 percent of parents in Wyoming read to their babies every day, compared with the national average of 38.2 percent. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Wyoming ranks toward the bottom nationally for early-childhood health and development, according to a new report measuring 60 indicators that affect the well-being of babies and toddlers up to age three. Myra Jones-Taylor, chief policy officer for the group Zero to Three, sai

SF 144, which would require Medicaid recipients to work in order to continue coverage, needs a hearing in the Wyoming House of Representatives' Committee of the Whole by Feb. 21 in order to advance. (U.S. Navy)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Proponents of a bill to add work requirements for Medicaid recipients in Wyoming believe the measure will be as successful as similar requirements for people who have left prison and food-stamp recipients. As the measure makes its way through the Legislature, Chris Merrill, ex

Research suggests that workers are 15 times more likely to save for retirement if it happens through automatic deductions at work. (Pixabay)

CASPER, Wyo. – Wyoming is moving forward with efforts to make sure all workers have access to a retirement plan through their jobs. State Sen. Jim Anderson, R-Glenwood, leads a task force exploring options to help workers put a small portion of each paycheck toward a retirement fund. He said

If the United States were to achieve economic gender parity, research shows it could add $1.75 trillion to its gross domestic product. (US Air Force)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Sunday marks Women's Equality Day, which commemorates the passage of a constitutional amendment guaranteeing women the right to vote. And according to a new report from the personal finance website WalletHub, equality between the sexes is still pretty far off. While women

Casper's Tuesday summer market includes a two-bites club for children. If they take two bites of that week's fruit or vegetable, they earn money to spend with local vendors. (Pixabay)

CASPER, Wyo. – The Food For Thought Summer Market at David Street Station in downtown Casper is starting to swell as the season's peak harvest draws near, and a new program is putting locally grown produce onto even more Wyoming dinner tables. Cassandra Baker, associate director of the Wyomi

More than 17 million people live within a mile of an active oil or gas well, including more than 2 million children and elderly people - groups especially vulnerable to air pollution and contaminated water. (Joshua Doubek/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Physicians' groups are sounding the alarm on the health risks posed by hydraulic fracturing, and have published a compendium of scientific evidence that they say confirms the damage caused by fracking operations. Joel Minor, associate attorney with the group Earthjustice, sa

SNAP benefits, sometimes called food stamps, help millions of low-income Americans put food on the table each month. (David Shankbone/Wikimedia Commons)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Congress is expected to begin work soon on the $140 billion farm bill, but there are concerns that some conservatives are targeting nutrition programs for cuts. Food programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and

Rising prices of prescription drugs are having a big impact on the nation's seniors. (Pixabay)

CHEYENNE, Wyo. – Despite increased scrutiny by Congress in the wake of the EpiPen scandal, prices for brand-name prescription drugs are on the rise. That's according to a new AARP study, which found that in 2015, the average cost for a single non-generic drug now exceeds $5,800 a year, compare

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