Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 24, 2017 


On today’s rundown, all eyes on the G.O.P. tax plan - labor groups say it’s not good for working families, and the view from Michigan is the likely loss of many services across the state; plus, report today on Black Friday and Native American Heritage Day

Daily Newscasts

Report: NC Power Plants Rank 12th for Global Warming Pollution

Photo: Environment North Carolina released the report, which analyzes data from the U.S. Dept. of Energy. Courtesy Environment North Carolina
Photo: Environment North Carolina released the report, which analyzes data from the U.S. Dept. of Energy. Courtesy Environment North Carolina
September 11, 2013

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Just days before the Environmental Protection Agency is expected to establish limits for carbon emissions for future power plants, a new report finds that North Carolina already has three of the "dirtiest" plants in the nation.

Environment North Carolina analyzed data the plants submit to the U.S. Department of Energy and ranked the state 12th in terms of global warming pollution. Brian Magi, who teaches atmospheric sciences at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte, reviewed the report.

"These numbers aren't coming from anybody with an agenda," he said. "It's coming from the people that actually have done the emissions, and the reason they're still burning fossil fuels is because we want them. So, at some point, we have to make a choice."

According to the report, "America's Dirtiest Power Plants," North Carolina's plants with the most carbon pollution are Belews Creek, Roxboro, Marshall, G.G. Allen and Mayo. They contribute 36 percent of the state's total climate-changing pollution.

Graham Givens, a clean-energy associate for Environment North Carolina, said generating electricity with coal doesn't have to be an "all or nothing" approach.

"We're not asking for power plants to shut down," he said. "We're asking for a carbon reduction. It is possible for power plants to reduce their carbon emissions."

According to the data, North Carolina's power plants emit as much CO2 as 15 million cars. Magi said reducing carbon emissions at the local level can have a big impact to reduce the effects of global warming.

"When I see a report like this," he said, "I think of how small-scale or grassroots efforts to try to bring attention to CO2 emissions and emitters can have global implications."

In addition to supporting the president's request for stricter emissions rules for new power plants, Environment North Carolina and others are asking that emissions be reduced at the thousands of existing plants across the nation.

The full report is online at environmentnorthcarolina.org.

Stephanie Carroll Carson, Public News Service - NC