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Super Bowl Time Brings Spike in Child Abuse Consults

PHOTO: The Denver Broncos will take on the Seattle Seahawks this weekend in Super Bowl XLVIII, and doctors are urging parents to let the aggression play out on the field, and not in their homes. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Images.

PHOTO: The Denver Broncos will take on the Seattle Seahawks this weekend in Super Bowl XLVIII, and doctors are urging parents to let the aggression play out on the field, and not in their homes. Photo courtesy of Microsoft Images.


January 30, 2014

KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Super Bowl Sunday is just days away and as excitement builds, doctors at one Missouri hospital are urging parents to find a way to cope with the strong emotions of the big game without taking it out on their children.

Dr. Tanya Burrell, a child abuse pediatrician at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, attributes the sharp rise in the number of cases her team is called to consult on this time of year to a combination of excessive passion for the game, big parties, gambling and too much drinking.

"We know that alcohol consumption does tend to cloud judgment, and that does put kids at risk,” she explains. “You know that also includes neglect, so supervisional neglect, different kinds of injuries."

Burrell encourages parents to plan ahead, and if they're throwing or attending a Super Bowl party, to make sure children are in a safe place to play and away from heightened emotion or aggression.

Burrell adds that there's nothing wrong with being passionate about the game and enjoying a good party, but she stresses that it is no excuse for parents to abandon their fundamental role.

"If there is a baby that is crying during a high time in the middle of the game, if you can't handle it, put the baby down, give the baby to someone else and then just step away,” she advises. “We are responsible for our kids, whether there is a Super Bowl game on or not."

Burrell says over the past several years, the number of child abuse consultations at Children's Mercy Hospital has doubled or even tripled in the weeks surrounding the Super Bowl, with doctors seeing a particularly marked increase in 2013.




Mona Shand, Public News Service - MO
 

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