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Report Grades NY on Raising its Children

PHOTO: A new report compares how children are progressing on key milestones by state, across racial and ethnic groups. It shows New York in the forefront in some cases, lagging in others. Photo courtesy Kids Count.

PHOTO: A new report compares how children are progressing on key milestones by state, across racial and ethnic groups. It shows New York in the forefront in some cases, lagging in others. Photo courtesy Kids Count.


April 1, 2014

ALBANY, N.Y. - A new report that compares how children are progressing on key milestones across racial and ethnic groups by state shows New York in the forefront in some ways, lagging in others.

The report from The Annie E. Casey Foundation Kids Count data center shows white children in New York in sixth place on a national index of 12 indicators that measure a child's success in each stage of life. New York's African American children are in 21st place, above the national average. However, Hispanics and Latinos came in 26th, with a score below the national average.

Lawrence Schell of the Center for the Elimination of Minority Health Disparities said, "The State of New York could do better. There's no question about that, and it would have great benefits, I believe, for our economy."

The report stated that if the performance of African-American and Latino students had caught up with white students' performance by 1998, the nation's gross domestic product 10 years later would have been $525 billion higher.

Schell said the report also shows the links between poverty and potential health-related outcomes for children.

"If we want to continue to have good health for American citizens, there's a clear connection between income disparity, the degree of inequality in income, and the degree of inequality in health," Schell said.

Laura Speer, associate director, The Annie E. Casey Foundation, said the Census Bureau projects that by 2018, children of color will represent a majority of American children.

"They're going to be the future workforce of the United States, so there's a really critical imperative to look at this now and to see what we can do to improve it," Speer said.

Nationwide, the report showed that Asian and Pacific Islander children had the highest index scores, followed by white, Latino, American Indian and African American children.

The Casey Foundation report is available at www.aecf.org.


Mark Scheerer, Public News Service - NY