Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 17, 2017 


The Keystone oil pipeline spills big time in South Dakota; a look at the GOP tax plan and it’s impact on the most vulnerable Americans; and renewed hope for Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters national monument.

Daily Newscasts

How Will MN Towns Weather the Increase in Weather Extremes?

PHOTO: More frequent severe weather extremes are a concern for rural residents across the Midwest, as witnessed by this abandoned tractor during flooding last year in North Dakota. Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.
PHOTO: More frequent severe weather extremes are a concern for rural residents across the Midwest, as witnessed by this abandoned tractor during flooding last year in North Dakota. Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Agriculture.
June 12, 2014

MORRIS, Minn. – With the changing climate and increase in frequency of weather extremes, the process of discussing the risks and developing a community-based response starts today in one Minnesota town.

The Rural Climate Dialogue is being held in Morris, and includes a 15-member citizen jury picked at random, says Anna Claussen, director of rural strategies at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.

"This process allows the community to make those decisions and decide what have been the biggest impacts, what are the biggest challenges for them and to hear from even community experts directly to make some of those decisions together," she explains.

Claussen says the Rural Climate Dialogue is the first step in an effort to spur rural leadership and build resiliency.

She also notes that this type of action is especially important to give rural communities a voice in policy debates around climate change.

"Because so much of our climate solutions are going to come from rural communities, come from our natural resource base,” she says. “And rural communities are also going to be more impacted by climate change policy."

In addition to the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, the Rural Climate Dialogue in Morris is also being organized by the Jefferson Center.

Executive Director Kyle Bozentko says those taking part will put together a report with their primary concerns and areas of opportunity.

"'Here's what we see happening,” he says. “Here's what we want to hold onto and promote about our community and here's what we think we can do about it.

“And so the next thing is supporting individuals who want to take action on those identified goals, as well as communicating and doing outreach that brings more people into the conversation."

The Rural Climate Dialogue runs today through Saturday at the West Central Research and Outreach Center and is open to the public.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - MN