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Summer Program Encourages Nevada Kids to Read

PHOTO: Library officials are hoping a program now in place will encourage more kids in Nevada to read during their summer vacation. Photo courtesy Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
PHOTO: Library officials are hoping a program now in place will encourage more kids in Nevada to read during their summer vacation. Photo courtesy Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
June 18, 2014

LAS VEGAS - Library officials are hoping a program now in place will encourage more kids in Nevada to read during their summer vacation.

The summer reading program is specially geared to help stop summer learning loss, said Natalia Tabisaura, youth services librarian for the Las Vegas-Clark County Library District. Not reading during the summer break, she said, can cause severe loss of reading skills in some students.

"Research shows that readers can fall behind an average of two months in reading skills," she said, "and when they go back to school in the fall, they often spend at least a month to re-teach everything that they lost."

Tabisaura said the summer reading program, available at all public libraries in Nevada, provides prizes to kids for reading books, but also helps parents learn which books their children should be reading based upon age and skill level.

She said another critical part of getting children to read during the summer is finding books that interest them.

"Making reading enjoyable, it makes learning enjoyable," she said, " and that way, it doesn't become a chore and because it will be rewarding in the long run. And you build lifelong readers by making reading fun."

Tabisaura said research shows that summer reading will help make good readers better and weaker readers stronger.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV