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Fast-Food Workers Plan Strike In Nevada Today

PHOTO: Fast food workers in Nevada are planning to strike today, as part of a nationwide day of action in hopes of boosting pay. Photo credit: Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada.

PHOTO: Fast food workers in Nevada are planning to strike today, as part of a nationwide day of action in hopes of boosting pay. Photo credit: Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada.


September 4, 2014

LAS VEGAS – Fast food workers in Nevada are planning to strike today as part of a nationwide day of action in hopes of boosting pay to a living wage.

Laura Martin, communications director at the Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada, says some employees at Burger King, KFC, McDonald's, Papa John's, Taco Bell, Sonic, Wendy's and other restaurants are expected to take part.

She says they're pushing for a wage of $15 per hour, and also hope to unionize.

"What a lot of fast food companies do is pay their workers these poverty wages, and then workers are forced to go on public assistance,” she points out. "So really, American taxpayers are subsidizing workers for these billion dollar corporations, and I think people have had enough."

Martin says the strikes are planned in at least 150 U.S. cities, and follow a recent national meeting of fast food workers that resulted in a unanimous vote to unionize.

She says similar strikes over the past 18 months have helped lead to changes, such as Seattle raising its minimum wage to $15 per hour.

Nicolette Roberts, an employee at a McDonald's in Las Vegas, is among those who will be striking today.

Roberts says she's applying for food stamps because her wage of $8.53 per hour is not enough to survive.

"As I apply for these fast food restaurants and they don't pay enough, then there comes a time when I need to apply for food stamps or some kind of assistance, so that I can be able to buy food for my family," she explains.

Roberts says she hopes that the McDonald's CEO will listen to the company's employees, and allow them to unionize and seek better wages.

Troy Wilde, Public News Service - NV