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PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to congress. Also on our rundown: more evidence that the rent is too, damn, high; Marathon County braces for sulfide mining; and the focus on recycling this weekend for Earth Day in North Dakota.

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Same-Sex Marriage Now Legal in Wisconsin

PHOTO: Same-sex marriages are now legal in Wisconsin, following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision not to hear appeals from Wisconsin and four other states regarding the matter. Some Wisconsin county clerks began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples immediately following the decision. Photo courtesy of Michael Sears, One Wisconsin Now.
PHOTO: Same-sex marriages are now legal in Wisconsin, following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision not to hear appeals from Wisconsin and four other states regarding the matter. Some Wisconsin county clerks began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples immediately following the decision. Photo courtesy of Michael Sears, One Wisconsin Now.
October 7, 2014

MADISON, Wis. - Same-sex marriage is now legal in Wisconsin, following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision not to hear an appeal from Wisconsin and four other states on the issue. County clerks in several Wisconsin counties began issuing same-sex marriage licenses immediately after the decision was announced Monday.

Scot Ross, executive director of the progressive advocacy group One Wisconsin Now, calls the Supreme Court's decision "significant."

"The decision is a definite rejection of some of the divisive politics of Governor Scott Walker and Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen, who fought so hard to deny same-sex couples their equal chance at marriage here in Wisconsin," says Ross.

Walker and Van Hollen had argued same-sex marriage would undermine the "moral fabric" of the state, and was contrary to the "tradition" of marriage in Wisconsin.

With Monday's decision, Ross sees a clear signal that a majority of Supreme Court Justices did not want to overturn lower court decisions that have ruled state prohibitions against same-sex marriage are unconstitutional.

Ross also noted the Supreme Court's decision not to hear appeals from Wisconsin and other states illustrates the public's changing attitudes toward same-sex unions. In 2006, 59 percent of Wisconsin voters approved a state constitutional amendment defining marriage as a union of one man and one woman, excluding same-sex couples.

Organizations like One Wisconsin Now have fought for marriage equality for some time, but Ross defers credit for the Supreme Court's decision.

"There have been people fighting across the state of Wisconsin for this issue longer and harder than we ever have," he says. "They're the ones who really deserve the kudos and the celebration, for the simple fact that people are treated equal under the law and there's not compelling state interest or national interest to deny loving same-sex couples their chance at marriage."

Tim Morrissey, Public News Service - WI