Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 24, 2018 


Trump’s Secretary of State nominee gets a narrow thumbs-up, but his Veteran’s Affairs nominee is put on hold. Also on our rundown: protests against Wells Fargo set for Des Moines today; and cannabis advocates blame Florida officials for “reefer madness.”

Daily Newscasts

Survey: Consumers Want High Mileage Despite Low Gas Prices

PHOTO: Gas prices may be low, but a new survey shows consumers donít believe prices will stay that way and they want their next car or truck to get better gas mileage. Photo courtesy of publicdomainpictures.net
PHOTO: Gas prices may be low, but a new survey shows consumers donít believe prices will stay that way and they want their next car or truck to get better gas mileage. Photo courtesy of publicdomainpictures.net
February 20, 2015

WASHINGTON, D. C. — Gas prices will go up again. That's what consumers believe, according to a new survey commissioned by the Consumer Federation of America. It also finds that car buyers still have an eye on better mileage.

Mark Cooper, CFA's director of research, says nearly 86 percent rank fuel efficiency as important when shopping for a new car or truck.

"They say they want to get about five or six miles per gallon more, compared to the vehicle that they own," explains Cooper. "So, they're very intelligent about gasoline prices."

He says people also see better mileage as a cushion against the rise and fall of gas prices while trying to set monthly budgets.

Jack Gillis, author of The Car Book (2014, Gillis Publishing Group), agrees that no one is fooled by today's low gas prices. The report's research shows that consumers could easily pay nearly double for gas each month when prices rise again.

"Consumers are smart and have long memories, so it's no surprise they still want more fuel efficiency, even though today's gas prices may be low," Gillis says.

The survey found those polled believe gas prices will be edging close to $4 a gallon five years from now, and prefer a car or truck that gets at least 30 miles per gallon.

The research also noted that Americans are driving fewer miles, and it's expected that will not change as younger generations shun vehicle ownership.

Deborah Courson Smith/Deb Courson Smith, Public News Service - MD