Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 24, 2017 


On today’s rundown, all eyes on the G.O.P. tax plan - labor groups say it’s not good for working families, and the view from Michigan is the likely loss of many services across the state; plus, report today on Black Friday and Native American Heritage Day

Daily Newscasts

Kenyan Student Learns Reforestation in WV Spruce Trees

PHOTO: A Kenyan university student inspired by Nobel Prize winner Wangari Maathai has spent the past five months learning about reforestation by planting spruce trees in West Virginia. Photo courtesy of CASRI.
PHOTO: A Kenyan university student inspired by Nobel Prize winner Wangari Maathai has spent the past five months learning about reforestation by planting spruce trees in West Virginia. Photo courtesy of CASRI.
May 15, 2015

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - A Kenyan college student is getting ready to take home lessons he learned over five months working in West Virginia's spruce reforestation.

University of Nairobi political science major Mart Kabochi, 22, has been in the state since the beginning of the year and has worked as an intern with the Central Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (CASRI). It's been a lot to take in, Kabochi said, but he wants to use what he's learned to help ramp up reforestation back home.

"Everything is just overwhelming," he said. "I have learned so much I can't even believe it myself - easier ways of planting the trees, how to take care of them. When I go back, I'm going to be a resource."

Kabochi said his time here has been "more than fantastic." Spruce restoration goes much faster than similar efforts at home, he said.

From the way Kabochi described it, it's hard to imagine more different forests than West Virginia's and those in Kenya. Kabochi said that where he comes from on the western side of Mount Kenya, it's flat, a little drier and a little hotter - an arid plain full of acacia trees.

"All the roads are straight. Like, everything is flat," he said. "My mom's house is just about five minutes' walk from the Equator. The trees in Kenya are way different. We don't have cherry, we don't have dogwood, we don't have spruce."

Kabochi said he was moved to work on reforestation by Kenyan national hero and Nobel Prize winner Wangari Maathai.

"We bought a book called 'Unbowed,' which Wangari Maathai wrote," he said, "and that did give me a lot of spirit. She's the one who inspired me."

Kabochi was in the Canaan Valley thanks to CASRI, the Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the West Virginia Highlands Conservancy. When he goes back, he said, he will be working on reforestation in the Serengeti and in a huge urban forest in Nairobi.

Dan Heyman, Public News Service - WV