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PNS Daily Newscast - April 19, 2018 


A contentious Farm Bill heads to U.S. House for debate. Also on our rundown: gaps cited in protections for small-business employees and nonprofit volunteers; plus some warning signs, that increased youth activism may not correspond to voter turnout.

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Fight Drug Abuse on National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

This Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, which is designed to keep people's extra medications out of the hands of addicts. (dodgerton skillhause/Morguefile)
This Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, which is designed to keep people's extra medications out of the hands of addicts. (dodgerton skillhause/Morguefile)
April 28, 2016

HELENA, Mont. - On April 30, Montanans are encouraged to clean out their medicine cabinets and bring any unused medication to 20 sites across the state for National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day. Statistics show 53 percent of people who abuse prescription painkillers get them from a friend or family member.

Kaelyn Kelly, prescription drug abuse-prevention coordinator at the Montana Attorney General's Office said, "Getting them out of your house just eliminates any potential for abuse by anyone that visits you. And it also eliminates any chance for accidental ingestion by children or pets."

A recent report from the state shows that drug overdoses are the third leading cause of injury-related death, after car crashes and suicides, claiming more than 1,300 Montanans between 2003 and 2014.

Kelly adds that doctors tailor prescriptions specifically for each patient, taking into account health status, weight, age and any other medications the person is taking.

"What might be OK for you to take is not OK for anyone else," she said. "That's why it's really important that you never share your prescriptions, and when you're done with a prescription, that you get it out of your household and you safely dispose of it."

The unused drugs are taken by law enforcement to be incinerated at a DEA facility out of state. Flushing them down the toilet can introduce unsafe levels of the drugs into the water supply.

For information on locations and on what can and cannot be accepted, go to Resolve Montana.org.

Suzanne Potter, Public News Service - MT