Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to Congress. Also on our rundown: More evidence that rent prices are out of reach in many markets; Wisconsin counties brace for sulfide mining; and the Earth Day focus this weekend in North Dakota is on recycling.

Daily Newscasts

Report: North Dakota a Top State for Kids ... Except Native Americans

While North Dakota ranks eighth among all states in the latest national Kids Count Data Book, the research shows Native American and other minority children still face serious disadvantages. (North Dakota Kids Count)
While North Dakota ranks eighth among all states in the latest national Kids Count Data Book, the research shows Native American and other minority children still face serious disadvantages. (North Dakota Kids Count)
June 23, 2016

BISMARCK, N.D. – North Dakota is among the top 10 states in the nation when it comes to children's well being, but a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation says there's still work to do, especially for Native American children.

In the latest national Kids Count Data Book, North Dakota ranks number eight, after showing big improvements in education and health care access.

The numbers also show the state has seen a big drop in the rates of teen drug abuse and teen pregnancy.

But Karen Olson, program director of North Dakota Kids Count, says the state continues to struggle with one of the highest rates of poverty among minority children.

"Half of all American Indian, African American, as well as Latino children are low income,” she points out. “So, despite the positive economic measures at the state level, many North Dakota families face challenges."

Olson says North Dakota could help ease the financial burdens on these families in several ways, including setting up a statewide paid family leave program and boosting child care assistance.

The Data Book ranks each state on 16 benchmarks, including health and education.

While North Dakota saw improvements or held steady in most areas, three indicators did get worse.

For example, the number of children whose parents lack steady jobs is on the rise. And the rate of children living in poverty has stayed at 15 percent since 2008.

Olson maintains North Dakota lawmakers should focus more attention on policies that would help Native American and other minority families.

"North Dakota has the fastest growing child population in the nation,” she points out. “Leading that pack is our minority youth. I think it's critical because they are facing the largest obstacles, not just with poverty but with education."

On the federal level, the report's authors suggest that increasing the Earned Income Tax Credit could help lift more families out of poverty.



Brandon Campbell, Public News Service - ND