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PNS Daily Newscast - April 20, 2018 


The DOJ delivers the Comey memos to Congress. Also on our rundown: More evidence that rent prices are out of reach in many markets; Wisconsin counties brace for sulfide mining; and the Earth Day focus this weekend in North Dakota is on recycling.

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U.S. Interior Secretary Visits Yellowstone for National Parks' 100th Birthday

The 100th anniversary of the creation of the National Park Service is being celebrated at Yellowstone, part of which is in Idaho. (Kevin Saff/flickr)
The 100th anniversary of the creation of the National Park Service is being celebrated at Yellowstone, part of which is in Idaho. (Kevin Saff/flickr)
August 25, 2016

BOISE, Idaho – The National Park Service was created 100 years ago today, and U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell is celebrating the centennial in Yellowstone National Park.

The celebration is being held in Gardiner, Mont., where Jewell will be joined by national park officials, the governors of Montana and Wyoming, and country singers Emmylou Harris and John Prine.

Kathy Rinaldi, Idaho conservation coordinator for the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, says parks such as Yellowstone, part of which is in Idaho, are an American treasure.

"I think that's part of the thing that makes America so great,” she states, “that we had the forethought a long time ago to have restraint and set areas and landscapes aside to not be developed, for preservation and enjoyment of future generations."

The event will begin at 7 p.m. Mountain Time and be livestreamed on the Internet.

Jewell has been touring national parks throughout the country this week in the run-up to the celebration at Yellowstone, the country's first national park.

Jewell has said climate change poses an "existential threat" to national parks.

Rinaldi says the park and the region have already seen the impacts of a warmer planet. For instance, 183 miles of the Yellowstone River was closed due to a parasite affecting whitefish, most likely caused by low, warm waters.

Rinaldi says Yellowstone is somewhat insulated from the worst of climate change.

"But we also see that that Greater Yellowstone area will start to get warmer and drier, will have impacts on habitat, which will have impacts on wildlife, which is one of the reasons that we have focused so much on conservation of both public and private lands," she states.

Rinaldi says climate change will affect recreational use of parks if fisheries are harmed by warmer temperatures, and also will affect the agricultural use of water as water demands become higher.

She says local organizations are partnering to create a dialogue between affected members of the community.



Eric Tegethoff, Public News Service - ID