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    PNS Daily News - July 2, 20150 


    We’re covering stories from coast to coast, including; the U.S. Supreme Court delays a Texas law that would have closed many of the state’s clinics that perform abortions, and the EPA says it will ban a pesticide which has been linked to ADHD, reduced IQ and other health conditions; and a report on the climate-driven rise in ticks and mosquitoes, which also raises the threat of potentially deadly insect-borne illnesses like Lyme Disease and the West Nile virus.

Climate Change/Air Quality

PHOTO: Colorado is poised to play a major role in U.S. efforts to address climate change. According to a new report, the state could cut carbon dioxide pollution that is equivalent to adding 4,800 wind turbines to its energy infrastructure in the next decade. Photo credit: Leaflet/Wikimedia Commons.

DENVER - By fully implementing policies already enacted at the local, state, and federal levels, the nation can reduce global-warming pollution by 27 percent below 2005 levels in the next decade. That's the finding of a new report by Environment America and the Frontier Group. Dickey-Lee Hullingho ...Read More

PHOTO: More fuel-efficient cars are helping Florida reduce carbon emissions. A new report says the state is doing well in that regard, compared to most other states. Photo credit: jppi/morguefile.com.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida has a big role to play in combating global warming, according to a new report released on Tuesday. Analysts for the nonprofit group Environment America examined the total reductions in carbon pollution projected, by state, for the next ten years. They found the Sun ...Read More

PHOTO: Warmer, wetter summers and shorter, milder winters have put the population of ticks and mosquitoes on the rise, which also increases the threat of insect-borne illnesses like Lyme disease and West Nile Virus. Photo credit: Scott Bauer, USDA ARS.

ST. LOUIS – If you're feeling particularly bugged by bugs this summer, you're not alone. Environmental experts are calling for action to address the climate-driven rise in ticks and mosquitoes, which raises the threat of insect-borne illnesses. Brian Nauert, president of Bugs By Brian, has be ...Read More

PHOTO: The nation's highest court has ordered a more detailed look at the costs of the EPA's new toxic emissions standards on coal-fired power plants. Photo credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

LEXINGTON, Ky. – Saying the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should have considered the costs of tougher emissions standards on the power industry, the U.S. Supreme Court has ordered the federal agency to take another look at its new rules on air pollution from coal-fired power plants. O ...Read More

PHOTO: A U.S. Supreme Court ruling over new rules regulating mercury pollution at coal-fired power plants is unlikely to change Montana operations, as Big Sky power plants have already complied with EPA rules. Historic photo of a Colstrip plant under construction courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

HELENA, Mont. – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday the costs of implementing smokestack technology to control mercury pollution should have been considered by the EPA before the agency proceeded to draft its Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. While the ruling means the agency has to rewrite s ...Read More

PHOTO: Legal experts predict the latest Supreme Court Ruling on the EPA's Mercury and Air Toxins rule won't derail efforts to reduce the number of coal-fired power plants in New York. Photo credit: M.D. Wilson.

NEW YORK – In a decision issued today, the U.S. Supreme Court told the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reconsider tougher standards on coal-fired power plants based on their cost to the industry. Richard Revesz, director of the Institute of Policy Integrity at the New York University ...Read More

GRAPHIC: The U.S. Supreme Court delayed a rule to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, although they let the rule stand while the EPA rewrites a portion of it. Mercury emissions typically enter the food chain through waterways. Graphic courtesy of the National Park Service.

INDIANAPOLIS – Critics say it's a win, and so do supporters. The U.S. Supreme Court decision on the EPA Mercury and Air Toxics Standards means the agency will have to go back to the drawing board on the rule, but the rule still stands in Indiana – at least for now. Earthjustice staff at ...Read More

PHOTO: Crab grass is a new invasive species showing up in Montana lawns because of milder winters.

BOZEMAN, Mont. - Montana gardeners have seen some surprises this year. New pests, diseases and invasive species are presenting challenges as the U.S. Department of Agriculture hardiness zones move north. Toby Day is a Montana State University Extension horticulture specialist who coordinates the mas ...Read More

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Climate Change/Air Quality by State