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    PNS Daily News - July 7, 20150 


    A variety of issues on today's nationwide rundown including; Kentucky getting feedback on updated fracking regulations, while activists are arrested in California protesting oil trains; a U-S District Judge being asked to intervene in the Illinois budget mess to protect vulnerable children; and a wild ride for Washington State workers comes to a happy ending.

Environmental Justice

PHOTO: Landowners concerned about the impact of deep-well fracking in Kentucky are displaying signs like this one as the state moves forward with the controversial method of oil and gas drilling. Photo credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

BEREA, Ky. – Bracing for a boom in deep-well fracking, state lawmakers revised Kentucky's regulations on oil and gas production in March. Environmentalists and landowners will now get to express their views about the regulatory revisions in a trio of public meetings across the commonwealth, b ...Read More

PHOTO: With Gov. Tom Wolf and legislative Republicans far apart on matters like education funding, one economic analyst says the GOP appears to be using a budget crisis they helped create to push for sweeping changes. Photo courtesy Pennsylvania House Archives.

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Analysts predict Pennsylvania's budget standoff will be short and not too damaging – but they warn that could change if either side holds out for extreme ideological positions. Economist Mark Price, research director at the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, says ...Read More

PHOTO: Turtles and many other species suffered in the 2005 BP oil spill. BP announced an $18.7 billion settlement Thursday. Florida's share is $3.25 billion. Photo courtesy of NOAA.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - Florida conservation groups say the BP settlement announced Thursday is a big step forward giving certainty that the funding will be there to restore the Gulf coast. It comes five years after the BP Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig exploded, releasing almost four billion barr ...Read More

PHOTO: The Obama Administration faces a legal challenge from a coalition of states, including Nevada, over the EPA's update to the Clean Water Rule. Photo courtesy of U.S. Dept. of Defense.

CARSON CITY, Nev. – Nevada is among thirteen states suing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over its updated Clean Water Rule. Nevada Attorney General Adam Paul Laxalt, who filed the suit this week, claims the rule amounts to a power grab by the federal government, seeking greater con ...Read More

PHOTO: The nation's highest court has ordered a more detailed look at the costs of the EPA's new toxic emissions standards on coal-fired power plants. Photo credit: Greg Stotelmyer.

LEXINGTON, Ky. – Saying the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should have considered the costs of tougher emissions standards on the power industry, the U.S. Supreme Court has ordered the federal agency to take another look at its new rules on air pollution from coal-fired power plants. O ...Read More

PHOTO: A U.S. Supreme Court ruling over new rules regulating mercury pollution at coal-fired power plants is unlikely to change Montana operations, as Big Sky power plants have already complied with EPA rules. Historic photo of a Colstrip plant under construction courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

HELENA, Mont. – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday the costs of implementing smokestack technology to control mercury pollution should have been considered by the EPA before the agency proceeded to draft its Mercury and Air Toxics Standards. While the ruling means the agency has to rewrite s ...Read More

PHOTO: Legal experts predict the latest Supreme Court Ruling on the EPA's Mercury and Air Toxins rule won't derail efforts to reduce the number of coal-fired power plants in New York. Photo credit: M.D. Wilson.

NEW YORK – In a decision issued today, the U.S. Supreme Court told the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to reconsider tougher standards on coal-fired power plants based on their cost to the industry. Richard Revesz, director of the Institute of Policy Integrity at the New York University ...Read More

GRAPHIC: The U.S. Supreme Court delayed a rule to control mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants, although they let the rule stand while the EPA rewrites a portion of it. Mercury emissions typically enter the food chain through waterways. Graphic courtesy of the National Park Service.

INDIANAPOLIS – Critics say it's a win, and so do supporters. The U.S. Supreme Court decision on the EPA Mercury and Air Toxics Standards means the agency will have to go back to the drawing board on the rule, but the rule still stands in Indiana – at least for now. Earthjustice staff at ...Read More

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