PNS Daily Newscast - March 20, 2018 

President Trump again calls for the death penalty for drug dealers and Granite State advocates say they oppose the get tough approach. Also on today’s rundown: a protest against the expansion of tar-sands oil refining in California; and in Seattle, a group demands a moratorium on youth jail construction.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - CO: Livable Wages/Working Families

Colorado could save up to $2 billion a year on health care and other costs associated with not having regular access to nutritious food. (Pixabay)


Government investment helped increase China's share of worldwide solar cell and panel production from 7 percent in 2005 to 61 percent in 2012. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Nearly 10,000 jobs nationwide were lost in the solar industry in 2017, according to a new report released by The Solar Foundation. But the group's eighth annual national jobs census also found that in states where solar is still ramping up, new jobs are on the rise. Solar Foundati

High-quality early learning and care leads to improved educational achievement and health, and increased employment and future earnings. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Lawmakers in Colorado have introduced a measure aimed at helping working families struggling with rising child care costs. The bill would allow families earning $25,000 a year or less to bump their state credit from the current 50 percent up to 80 percent of what they get from the f

One in four American mothers in states without paid family medical-leave policies returns to work two weeks after giving birth for economic reasons. (Pixabay)

DENVER — Colorado workers, small-business owners and some lawmakers plan to gather on the west steps of the State Capitol today in support of the Colorado FAMLI Act, a bill that would create a worker-financed paid family leave program. Neha Mahajan, state director of the group 9to5 Colorado,

The percentage of low-wage earners in Colorado has been growing since 2010. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's lowest-paid workers got a raise this week as the minimum wage increased by 90 cents to $10.20 an hour. But, for workers in many parts of the state, that still isn't enough to be financially self-sufficient. Chris Stiffler, an economist with the Colorado Fiscal Institute

The price of Christmas trees is expected to increase by as much as 10 percent this year. (Pixabay)

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – For many people, Christmas is just not complete without a decorated tree inside a warm home. David Fein, who describes himself as the "lead Elf" for the all-volunteer Christmas Tree Project, has made it his mission to get free trees to families struggling financiall

Children with health coverage are more likely to finish high school and college, and have higher earnings when they enter the workforce. (Pixabay)

DENVER – Colorado's financial reserves have kept the Children's Health Insurance Program, or CHIP, running since Congress allowed funding to expire at the end of September. But Erin Miller, vice president of health initiatives with the Colorado Children's Campaign, says those reserves are al

Consumer advocates warn that tax breaks that primarily benefit corporations and the top one percent of earners could lead to cuts to Medicare and Medicaid. (Getty Images)

DENVER – As Republicans work to bridge divides between the House and Senate versions of their new tax legislation, consumer advocates are warning that the measure could have significant health consequences. By removing the Affordable Care Act's mandate for all people to buy health insurance,

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