Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 16, 2018  


New Medicaid work requirements could leave many without coverage; we get perspective from Utah. Also on the rundown: a look at the impact of the Trump administrations efforts to erase references to climate change; and Reading Partners Baltimore inspires struggling readers.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WA: Social Justice

On Wednesday, a Washington State Senate committee held a public hearing in Olympia on two bills that address the gender pay gap in the state. (SounderBruce/Flickr)

OLYMPIA, Wash. -- At its current rate, the pay gap for women in Washington state compared to men won't close until 2070. As the new legislative session begins, hopes are high that 2018 is the year lawmakers update the state's equal-pay laws and close that gap much sooner. On Wednesday, the Senate

Recidivism rates are higher for people who aren't able to find a job after they're released from prison. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

OLYMPIA, Wash. – A bill that would help formerly incarcerated Washingtonians get a fairer chance at employment is scheduled for a public hearing Wednesday. The Fair Chance Act would "ban the box" – that is, prevent employers from asking about a person's criminal background until after

The campaign for Initiative 940 has gathered more than 300,000 signatures. (De-Escalate Washington)

SEATTLE – Andre Taylor moved back to his hometown the day after he heard his younger brother, Che Taylor, a 46-year-old African-American man, had been shot and killed by two white Seattle police officers. Since that day in February 2016, Andre Taylor has been on a mission, becoming a leader

The Unlocking Futures program chose the Prison Scholar Fund and seven other businesses to receive support to expand their reach. (Dirk Van Velzen/Prison Scholar Fund)

SEATTLE – What would it take to reform criminal justice and reduce the number of people who return to prison? A nonprofit group in Washington state might have the answer. The Prison Scholar Fund helps people behind bars finance their college education. So far, the program has been very suc

The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals serves the western part of the country, including Washington state, and has several judgeship vacancies. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

SEATTLE -- President Donald Trump is fulfilling his promise to reshape the judicial branch. But some of his nominations have legal experts concerned he could be putting the integrity of the courts at risk. One of Trump's latest nominees for a federal court judgeship, Brett Talley, has never tried

A massive raid that was planned for September, known as

SEATTLE -- Here in Washington and across the nation, civil rights and immigrants' advocacy groups are suing over the federal government's refusal to fulfill a Freedom of Information Act request about a recently planned immigration raid. In September, immigrant groups obtained details of "Operation

Aneelah Afzali has been speaking directly to communities about the misconceptions surrounding Islam on her tour of Washington cities. (Council on American-Islamic Relation)

MOUNT VERNON, Wash. — Local faith leaders have been touring cities in Washington, exposing what they say is a well-funded industry focused on spreading Islamaphobia. Aneelah Afzali, executive director of the American Muslim Empowerment Network - an initiative from the Redmond mosque the Musl

Arizona's Senate Bill 1070, also known as the

SEATTLE – People with anti-immigrant sentiments are emboldened after laws designed to punish immigrants are passed, according to a study by a University of Washington researcher. Rene Flores, an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at UW, included fieldwork and people's opinion

1 of 16 pages   1 2 3 >  Last »