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PNS Daily News - September 26, 2017 


Today’s news focuses on several issues including: a third Republican opposing the latest Obamacare repeal effort; a look at the safety of personal information on this Voter Registration Day; and U.S. crime still historically low despite a recent rise.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Social Justice

Under the Cassidy-Graham plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act, federal funding for Medicaid to the states would fall sharply, especially in 2027. (Center On Budget and Policy Priorities)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - The health care bill Senate Republicans are rushing to finish would cripple West Virginia opioid treatment and end Medicaid expansion, according to an analysis that also says the bill could end coverage of pre-exisiting conditions. Sean O'Leary, senior policy analyst for the We

Public News Service reporter Dan Heyman faced six months of jail time for an incident in May at the West Virginia State Capitol. (D. Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – A West Virginia journalist whose arrest drew national attention is off the hook. Prosecutors dismissed charges on Wednesday against Dan Heyman, a reporter for Public News Service, who faced six months of jail time for an incident in May at the State Capitol. The officia

Grassroots groups in West Virginia organized to put public pressure on Sen. Shelley Moore Capito ahead of last week's health care votes. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- Grassroots public pressure in states like West Virginia had a role in defending the Affordable Care Act. Leading into last week's dramatic final votes, organizations and ordinary citizens across the state put on dozens - maybe hundreds - of events. Selina Vickers of Fayette Co

A West Virginia minister says she'll do anything she can - including going on a hunger strike - to get senators such as Shelley Moore Capito to vote against healthcare legislation. (Janice Hill/Youtube)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The West Virginia minister famous for telling a senator how the Affordable Care Act saved her daughter's life now says she plans a hunger strike to oppose the ACA's repeal. Reverend Janice Hill of Parkersburg met with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito to testify against the Senat

Some recovering opioid users in West Virginia say the treatment they get through Medicaid is all that's keeping them from an addiction that could kill them. (3/Wikipedia)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- One of the big issues in the current healthcare debate is what will happen to Medicaid support for substance abuse treatment. Some in West Virginia say they're afraid losing it could kill them. Bailey Hendricks is a single mother from St. Albans, and a recovering opioid addict.

Some observers say the fastest path to job growth would be to stay in the Paris climate agreement. (Alfred Palmer)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Leaving the Paris climate agreement would put the United States behind, according to some energy market and job creation watchers. Media leaks from the White House say President Donald Trump is leaning toward leaving the climate accord, but the administration has not conf

A group of protesters at the West Virginia State Capitol, awaiting the arrival of U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price. (Public News Service-Dan Heyman) (Note: photo was originally misidentified. Heyman took the photo, he was not in it.)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. - Reporter Dan Heyman, who covers West Virginia and Virginia for Public News Service, was arrested inside the State Capitol in Charleston on Tuesday afternoon. Heyman was at the Capitol to cover a visit by U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price and White House adviser

Medicaid supports much of the health-care provided in West Virginia schools. (Mary Kuhlman)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – Health care providers say a Republican bill that includes Medicaid cuts would threaten West Virginia's school health services. Medicaid pays much of the cost for school nurses and therapists here, and for more than 50 school-based community clinics, many in rural areas.

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