Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 23, 2017 


In focus on our Thanksgiving Day rundown; U.S. cities take steps to manage transition away from fossil fuel; Hoosier hunters help feed the hungry; social media use now linked to teen suicide; and some pre-Black-Friday tips on avoiding holiday scams.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - WV: Water

A new report says cuts to EPA air-quality grants alone will hobble state and local programs to protect West Virginians' health. (Pixabay)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Deep cuts to federal grants that help state and local officials protect clean air and water would threaten the health and livelihoods of West Virginians, according to a new report. The Trump Administration has proposed cutting nearly one-third from the Environmental Protec

The Grant Town Power Plant is in the middle of a contentious argument at the West Virginia Public Service Commission. (Edison International)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The Monongahela Power Company is asking ratepayers to pay more to bail out a Marion County power plant that critics charge is dirty, already expensive and damaging to the air, land and water. Customers currently pay a bit above the market rate for the Grant Town Power Pla

Angie Rosser, West Virginia Rivers Coalition, says ordinary folks are going to have to get involved if they want lawmakers to protect water quality. (Dan Heyman)

CHARLESTON, W. Va. – Community groups are harshly criticizing legislation they say would hurt West Virginia streams and drinking water, and they feel ordinary residents are being left out of the legislative process. Angie Rosser, executive director of the West Virginia Rivers Coalition, say

Comments from the public moved several Republican lawmakers in West Virginia to break with their party and vote against a controversial pollution bill. (W. Va. Legislature)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- House Bill 2506 - nicknamed the "Cancer Creek Bill" by its critics - passed the West Virginia House of Delegates last week, but not before a public outcry pushed several delegates to oppose it. The bill would permit more pollution in surface waters by changing how the state me

Utilities in southern coastal states are cleaning up the coal ash left from decades of power generation. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.V. — As Congress debates the issue, utilities and communities in southeastern states are moving ahead with clean up of millions of tons of coal ash in impoundments at power plants. Until recently, Congress had been deadlocked regarding this legacy of a coal-powered century. In

Adam Swisher and Matt Kearns traveled the length of the Elk River. They say protecting it will be good for West Virginia's future. (Chad Cordell)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. – As West Virginians consider their future, some say the Elk River runs right through it. In part to build support for the Birthplace of Rivers National Monument, Adam Swisher and Matt Kearns hiked, biked and paddled the entire Elk River in what they called the Elkspedition

The company behind a planned frack wastewater recycling plant says low-level radioactive waste that would come from it will be properly disposed of. (Sierra Club)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. - The sludge that would come from an Antero frack wastewater recycling plant would be low-level radioactive material, but Antero says it will be properly disposed of. Some people in Doddrige County and the gas fields are worried about what will happen to the somewhat radioactive

In part because of drill cuttings such as these, once you take the salt and water out of fracking waste, the remaining sludge is hot enough to be considered low-level radioactive waste. (Bill Hughes)

CHARLESTON, W.Va - Recycling of fracking waste can reduce water use and pollution from the wells, but only by creating low-level nuclear waste too hot for landfills. One fracking-waste recycler is operating near Fairmont and another is planned for Doddridge County. They take the brine, mud and drill

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