Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - January 22, 2018 


The funding stumble in Congress deepens the crisis for health centers; also on our nationwide rundown; we will let you know about concerns over possible "gifts" to payday lenders; and a new survey provides alarming numbers about young people and homelessness.

Daily Newscasts

Public News Service - OR: Urban Planning/Transportation

Bonneville Dam is one of many in the Columbia River basin. (Colleen Benelli/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – Columbia River Treaty negotiations between the United States and Canada are set to begin in 2018, and advocates for the environment say the river's health should be the focus of talks. Conversation, fishing and faith-based groups, as well as tribes in the Columbia River basi

The Oregon Legislature this year passed a bill that will offer rebates up to $2,500 to electric-vehicle purchasers. (Oregon Department of Transportation/Flickr)

PORTLAND, Ore. – The auto industry and supporters of electric vehicles don't want to see Congress put the brakes on an electric vehicle tax incentive, but the fuel's future still is looking bright. Industry leaders such as Tesla, Nissan and General Motors are opposing the House Republicans'

Oregonians are gathering at the Capitol today to push legislators to help ease the state's housing crisis. (AARP)

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon's popularity as an attractive destination has had a side effect on housing markets across the state. Oregonians face pressures from many sides. Cities have low vacancy rates, rents are increasing rapidly, and property owners can evict renters without cause, meaning people

Oregon received a mix of grades on an annual report card assessing the state's transition to clean energy. (Karen Murphy/Flickr)

SALEM, Ore. – A new report card on Oregon's transition to clean energy shows a mix of successes and failures. The state received an A-minus for the ways it produces power, getting high marks for passing the Clean Electricity and Coal Transition Act, which ensures the state will get 80 percent

Oregon is looking into ways to make its electrical grid more secure in the wake of a potential disaster like the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. (USGS/Wikimedia Commons)

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon will be getting some help in preparing its energy grid for natural disasters such as the large Cascadia earthquake scientists believe could devastate the Northwest. The state has been chosen by the National Governors Association for a "policy academy," which will include

In lieu of a ballot measure to end the use of coal power in Oregon, major utilities offered to negotiate a transition plan and timeline. (columbia114/morguefile)

PORTLAND, Ore. - A new approach and new timeline for state energy policy awaits the Oregon Legislature for consideration. Utilities, clean-energy groups and consumer advocates have just unveiled a plan to ensure the state will be coal-free by 2030, and that the state's two largest power companies

Portland International Airport janitor Julie Hayden spoke at a national rally this week in support of a $15 minimum wage and the right to join a union. Courtesy: SEIU

PORTLAND, Ore. - Oregon's busiest airport isn't among the seven where service workers went on strike on Thursday, but janitors, baggage handlers, wheelchair assistants and others at Portland International Airport say they have all the same complaints. Julie Hayden, who works as a janitor at PDX, ca

Surely signs such as this won't be necessary to get Oregon motorists to slow down, pay attention and reduce the number of fatal crashes involving older pedestrians. Credit: Ariadna/Morguefile.

PORTLAND, Ore. – The U.S. Surgeon General decreed on Wednesday that walking should be a bigger priority to improve the nation's health – but in Oregon, both city dwellers and rural residents may be risking their lives just crossing a road. According to The State of Pedestrian Safety rep

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