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PNS Daily News - December 16, 2019 


Sen. Chuck Schumer calls for four specific witnesses in Senate impeachment trial; giving Iowans with disabilities a voice in caucuses; and an expert says Seasonal Affective Disorder is a lot more than just the holiday blues.

2020Talks - December 16, 2019 


Sen. Cory Booker led the charge asking the DNC to ease up debate qualification requirements. All seven candidates who made the cut for Thursday's debate say they won't participate in the debate at Loyola Marymount in LA if it means crossing the picket line of Unite Here Local 11.

Study Warns Nevadans to "Get Used to Drought" and Wildfires

July 13, 2007

The latest spate of wild fires and hot dry weather are just a taste of things to come according to new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council. The report warns the current drought gripping half the country is just the beginning and there are troubling implications for the massive water transfer plan for Las Vegas. Comments from Barry Nelson, co-author of the report, and Jim Deacon, UNLV Emeritus Professor of Environmental Studies and Biology.

The latest spate of wild fires and hot dry weather are just a taste of things to come according to new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council. The report warns the current drought gripping half the country is just the beginning and there are troubling implications for the massive water transfer plan for Las Vegas. Barry Nelson, co-author of the report, explains.

“As our climate warms, which it is doing right now, we are going to see more evaporation, and we're simply going to see less water in our rivers and streams.”

Last weekend, eight wildfires charred more than 160,000 acres in Nevada and Nelson says until the nation finds a way to fight back on global warming, even more wildfires can be expected.

“Global warming is a real water supply and economic issue, not just an environmental issue, and this is one more reason we need to take prompt action.”

Jim Deacon, UNLV professor emeritus of environmental studies, adds that study raises more red flags when it comes to the Southern Nevada Water Authority plan to pipe more water to Las Vegas which relies on water sources that are diminishing.

“It actually is the principal red flag, because it effects not only groundwater supplies, but also Colorado River flows. So, the Colorado River is projected, over the long term, to have declining flows. In addition, the quantity of groundwater recharge is expected to diminish.”

Fast Company, a national magazine, just labeled Las Vegas "an environmental pileup in the making," in part because of water troubles.

The full report is online at www.nrdc.org.

Michael Clifford/Eric Mack, Public News Service - NV