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PNS Daily Newscast - August 13, 2020 


Minutes after Biden selected Harris as VP, she throws first punch at Trump; teachers raise their hands with safety concerns.


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Joe Biden and Kamala Harris make their first public appearance as running mates. President Trump calls Georgia's Marjorie Taylor Greene a GOP "star," despite her support for conspiracy theory QAnon.

MT Takes Aim at More than Hunting and Fishing

July 30, 2007

Two million dollars for about 600 kinds of critters. That's the new deal in Montana. The legislature put aside $1 million to spend on all wildlife and habitat and that will be matched with another million in federal money. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks director Jeff Hagener says it's a big deal because wildlife projects are usually only funded through hunting and fishing license fees. The new money will mean a broader focus.

"We can use that for the conservation and management of all wildlife, not just limited to hunted and fishable. It shows that all of Montana has an interest in our fish and wildlife, and their habitat."

Hagener explains that Montana has already evaluated almost 200 habitats to make sure they're healthy and will stay healthy in the future. They found that work needs to be done on public and private land to repair wetlands, riparian zones, prairies and forests to keep wildlife populations steady.

Rich Day with the Montana Wildlife Federation adds that the state has a five-year plan to analyze wildlife and their habitats, and the new money will be used to focus on where species aren't doing so well.

"We're going to put the emphasis on that and then try to work with private landowners and others so those different species don't decline further."

Deborah Smith/Eric Mack, Public News Service - MT