Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - November 14, 2019 


New evidence arises from the first impeachment hearing; one in four federal student loan borrowers defaults early on; and growing proof that vaping isn't the healthy alternative it was thought to be.

2020Talks - November 14, 2019 


It's World Diabetes Day, and health care, including the high cost of insulin and other drugs, is a top issue for many voters. Plus, do early states like Iowa and New Hampshire have an outsized role in the nomination process?

Daily Newscasts

Mining Reform Plan Digs for Changes in WYO

November 2, 2007

Cheyenne, WY – Gold and uranium may soon no longer be "free for the taking" on public land in Wyoming. Yesterday, the U.S. House passed the "Hardrock Mining and Reclamation Act," an update of the nation's 135-year-old General Mining Law. Jane Danowitz, director of the Pew Campaign for Responsible Mining, says the changes would bring money to Wyoming to make abandoned mine sites safe.

"It would establish a royalty for mining companies that are taking public resources off of public lands, it would require funds to be put into an abandoned mine cleanup fund."

Danowitz adds the mining bill update has support from states with long mining histories, as well as environmental groups, and taxpayer watchdogs.

"The diverse groups behind the vote signal the end of an era when only a handful of powerful mining companies could dictate the content of the nation’s mining laws."

Opponents say the royalty amounts required by the Act are too high, and the environmental requirements too stringent, but conservation groups say mining companies should learn to pay for what they take from federal land, and clean up when they leave. The revision of the law comes as several companies are proposing to mine uranium from public lands in Wyoming.


Deborah Smith/Chris Thomas, Public News Service - WY