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PNS Daily Newscast - August 14, 2020 


Trump rebuffs Biden's call for a national mask mandate; nurses warn of risks of in-person school.


2020Talks - August 14, 2020 


Responses to President Trump's suggestion that he opposes more Postal Service funding in part to prevent expanded mail-in voting; and Puerto Rico's second try at a primary on Sunday.

Fed Global Warming Report: Heatwaves, Rain and Coastal Flooding in North East

June 17, 2009

New York, NY — A detailed scientific report released by the federal government on Tuesday says the effects of climate change are happening now, and becoming more serious. They include heavier rainfall, more heat waves and coastal flooding.

For New York, the report says $2.3 trillion of coastal property is in potential jeopardy due to increased flood risks. Such a disaster would be the result of larger storms, which the report indicates will happen more frequently, according to climate scientist Dr. Amanda Staudt of the National Wildlife Federation.

"A flood, such as occurs in New York City only once a century, will happen every ten years if we fail to address climate change very soon."

Staudt was a contributor to the report, a compilation of data from more than a dozen federal agencies. Despite some critics' claims that hotter temperatures are part of the earth's natural cycle and unrelated to human activity, the report cites human-induced emission of heat-trapping gases as the chief reason for global warming.

The document, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States," comes at just the right time, says Abigail Dillen, a staff attorney with the law firm Earthjustice. In her view, it puts Congress on notice that action is needed now on the American Clean Energy and Security Act, legislation to curb global warming emissions.

"What this report says to us, is that we can no longer carry on business as usual. We need to make big changes to avoid the kinds of really disastrous climate impacts that we're facing, in New York and throughout the rest of the country."

Dillen believes it is critical that Congress stick to the science in its debate about HR 2454 and other climate change legislation, and not allow industry to dilute the changes that are needed.

The full report, from the Interagency Global Climate Research Program, is online at www.globalchange.gov.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NY