Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 6,2020 


Today is the final day to register to vote in Arizona's primary election; the FDA declines to back Trump claim that 99% of coronavirus cases are "harmless."

2020Talks - July 6, 2020 


This year's July 4th had COVID-19, ongoing protests about systemic racism, and a presidential visit to Mt. Rushmore. Plus, Trump signed an order to plan a new statue park.

ACA Spells Relief for NH Young Adults: But What About Retirement?

PHOTO: Out of the frying pan and into the fire—the Supreme Court  just upheld the Affordable Care Act—but polls show many young people in New Hampshire and the nation are still concerned about retirement.
PHOTO: Out of the frying pan and into the fire—the Supreme Court just upheld the Affordable Care Act—but polls show many young people in New Hampshire and the nation are still concerned about retirement.
July 2, 2012

NASHUA, N.H. - Out of the frying pan and into the fire. The U.S. Supreme Court just upheld the Affordable Care Act, but polls show many young people in New Hampshire and across the nation still are concerned about planning ahead for retirement.

Sarah Warner, MMP (Master of Public Policy) and executive director of the New Hampshire Citizens Alliance, says about 10,000 young New Hampshire residents will benefit directly from last week's high court ruling. However, she points out, recent research shows that 76 percent of young Americans have doubts about the future of Social Security.

"It's a sigh of relief that young adults can stay on their parent's health care because of the Affordable Care Act, but they're also a little nervous about, 'Well, what does my life look like when I retire?' They're nervous that Social Security won't be there for them."

Warner says young people may not realize that Social Security is running a surplus, because many erroneously believe the program is broke. Those who want to dismantle it are convinced that private investment firms could help Americans plan for their retirement. Warner hopes folks remember friends and neighbors who lost their retirement money when the last Wall Street bubble popped.

Olvia Zink is a community organizer at New Hampshire Citizen's Alliance. She says a recent poll by Lake Research also shows about half of people under age 40 think Social Security is in crisis. She says that's no accident, and blames what she calls "a fear campaign" by the financial industry.

"As a 31-year-old adult, I've heard and seen the marketing. There's been a huge marketing campaign that government's not working, and we need to put our trust in Wall Street."

On the issue of retirement security, Zink says, the younger and older generations have more in common than they might suspect.

"The younger generation really needs to not be divided, and they need to join with the seniors to say, 'Social Security is coming out of my check every month, and I have a promise to get this back when I retire.'"

Projections show that Social Security is 100 percent solvent through 2036, she adds, and it will only take small changes that can be made by Congress to allow it to keep paying full benefits for many years to come.

The Alliance has more information about Social Security on this website, http://nhcitizensalliance.org/. The survey is from Gallup, Oct. 2010.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH