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PNS Daily Newscast - November 15, 2018 


Lawyer Michael Avenatti arrested on a domestic violence charge. Also on the Thursday rundown: More testimony on Ohio's "anti-protest" bill; and we'll take you to the Dakotas to celebrate American Education Week.

Daily Newscasts

A Generation in Jeopardy? Linking Pesticides and Childhood Diseases

PHOTO: A new report says the prevalence of childhood diseases and disorders is growing in part due to kids' exposure to chemicals used in pesticides. CREDIT: Courtesy of Pesticide Action Network.
PHOTO: A new report says the prevalence of childhood diseases and disorders is growing in part due to kids' exposure to chemicals used in pesticides. CREDIT: Courtesy of Pesticide Action Network.
October 15, 2012

BISMARCK, N.D. - The prevalence of childhood diseases and disorders is growing in North Dakota and the U.S. A new report says that's due in part to the extensive use of pesticides.

Dr. David Wallinga, with the food and health program at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, says the list includes learning disabilities, childhood cancer, asthma and autism.

"A lot of science keeps getting stronger and stronger, linking pretty serious health conditions with evidence that contributing to those conditions is our huge use of pesticides and the exposure of children, starting really in the womb and going forward."

Wallinga says some 20,000 pesticides are in use today, and many were approved without considering their possible health effects on children.

While many may assume that pesticide drift is an issue only in rural North Dakota, Wallinga says city residents are also affected.

"Pesticides are used in all sorts of different environments - not just in agriculture, but in households, on lawns. And then, a lot of these residues of pesticides either drift in the wind or get deposited by rainfall, so they can easily travel far from where they're applied."

Suggestions on dealing with drift range from supporting innovation, to transition away from pesticide use, to establishing pesticide-free zones around places like schools and child care centers.

More information is available at www.panna.org.



John Michaelson, Public News Service - ND