Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to probe women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

Daily Newscasts

Keys to Happy & Healthy Pregnancies

PHOTO: Pregnancies in Iowa should conclude with a healthy mother and child, and experts say the way to avoid problem pregnancies involves a few simple steps. Photo by iStockphoto
PHOTO: Pregnancies in Iowa should conclude with a healthy mother and child, and experts say the way to avoid problem pregnancies involves a few simple steps. Photo by iStockphoto
January 30, 2013

DES MOINES, Iowa - Pregnancies in Iowa should conclude with a healthy mother and child, and experts say the way to avoid problem pregnancies involves a few simple steps.

Dr. Erin Lehman, a Des Moines obstetrician and gynecologist, says a healthy diet during pregnancy can help reduce the risk of a child developing diabetes or heart disease later in life. However, she says, that doesn't mean following the old adage of “eating for two.”

“You’re really never ‘eating for two’,” Lehman says. “That’s where people sometimes get into trouble with pregnancies with excessive weight gain in pregnancy, and also increased of risk of diabetes in pregnancy, because of eating too much.”

About 200 extra calories a day, the equivalent of two small slices of bread, is all that’s recommended for pregnant women,” Lehman says. She notes that making the lifestyle changes that will help a woman become “baby-ready” can be tough, so expectant mothers shouldn’t be afraid to ask for help.

“It is important to have good mental health throughout the pregnancy,” she says. “We want you to have a happy, healthy pregnancy and sometimes, during pregnancy or after pregnancy, you have increased risks of anxiety and depression. But if you're seeing your health-care provider regularly, they should be asking questions throughout pregnancy; it's standard prenatal care."

The last step, Lehman says, is to stop smoking - and, if you don't smoke, avoid secondhand smoke.

Richard Alan, Public News Service - IA