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Texas Takes on The Most Common Infectious Disease

PHOTO: The number of chlamydia cases in the state has nearly doubled in the past decade, with the figure from 2010 surpassing 28,000. CREDIT: jnissa
PHOTO: The number of chlamydia cases in the state has nearly doubled in the past decade, with the figure from 2010 surpassing 28,000. CREDIT: jnissa
February 14, 2013

AUSTIN, Texas - Work continues in Texas against the state's most common infectious disease. The number of chlamydia cases reported in the state has been growing steadily for years and had reached more than 122,000 in 2011. Tammy Foskey, manager of the Texas Department of State Health Services HIV/STD public health follow-up team, said part of the problem is that this sexually transmitted disease (STD) can be asymptomatic.

"In fact, the majority of persons, both males and females, with chlamydia will not have symptoms that will cause them to go to the doctor," she said. "So too often persons don't seek out testing and treatment for it because they themselves feel fine."

The screening for chlamydia is non-invasive, and the disease is easily treated once detected. If not, it can put a person at a much higher risk to contract other STDs. Without treatment, Foskey said, it can also lead to long-term health complications.

"Victims can develop chronic pelvic pain, pelvic inflammatory disease," Foskey warned, "which may or may not lead to infertility issues. Or if they get pregnant, it may be an ectopic pregnancy - a pregnancy that occurs outside the uterus - and therefore is not a viable pregnancy."

Texans ages 15 to 25 are most affected by chlamydia, and it is diagnosed more often in women than in men, she added.

More information is available at http://bit.ly/X4ugrt.

John Michaelson, Public News Service - TX