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PNS Daily Newscast - October 28, 2020 


A technical error rejected your ballot? Take action. Plus, doctors sound off on harmful health impacts of tailpipe emissions.


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The window is closing to mail ballots in states like GA, MI and WI that require them to be received before Election Day. Experts recommend going in-person if possible.

May is "Garden for Wildlife" Month

Photo: The National Wildlife Federation is calling on Virginians to create their own wildlife habitats in yards and neighborhoods. Courtesy of NWF.
Photo: The National Wildlife Federation is calling on Virginians to create their own wildlife habitats in yards and neighborhoods. Courtesy of NWF.
May 15, 2013

RICHMOND, Va. - The National Wildlife Federation is calling on Virginians to turn their backyards into thriving wildlife habitats. May is "Garden for Wildlife" Month, and the federation's message is that it's easy to create a welcoming home for wildlife.

People can create a certified habitat by providing sources of water, food, and shelter for birds and animals, said naturalist David Mizejewski, adding that they also need a safe place to raise their young, even in the smallest of outdoor spaces.

"Food could be as simple as planting some flowers for the butterflies, maybe a shrub that has berries for the birds," he said. "A birdbath counts as water."

Dense shrubs can be a shelter or a nursery.

To keep unwanted critters out of gardens, Mizejewski said catch-and-release traps are not the best option because wildlife often have trouble surviving after they're released.

"If you have a vegetable garden and you live in deer country, or maybe groundhogs, or rabbits or gophers or what have you, fencing is probably what you want to think about doing," he said.

People can get a personalized certificate and product discounts from the National Wildlife Federation by applying for a wildlife habitat certification for their yard online at nwf.org.

Alison Burns, Public News Service - VA