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Moral Mondays Go Statewide as Voter Approval of McCrory Drops

A poll released last week by Raleigh-based Public Policy Polling found that Gov. McCrory's approval rating stands at an all-time low: 39 percent.
A poll released last week by Raleigh-based Public Policy Polling found that Gov. McCrory's approval rating stands at an all-time low: 39 percent.
August 19, 2013

CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Today, Raleigh will take a break from the thousands of people working to let state lawmakers know their feelings on recent actions by the State Assembly and Gov. McCrory. Instead, Moral Mondays are going on tour - with events planned in Charlotte and Manteo.

Bob Hall, executive director, Democracy North Carolina, said the peaceful protests are an effective way for citizens to provide feedback to government leaders.

"I think voters need to hold their politicians accountable for their actions," Hall said. "Being a citizen is more than just voting that one day. It's good to keep track of what they do and then let them hear from you."

Hall and others are specifically concerned about what they have called a "Voter Suppression Bill." Late last week the North Carolina NAACP and Southern Coalition for Social Justice filed lawsuits claiming the new Voter ID requirements will result in voter suppression and election manipulation.

Recent actions in Raleigh appear to be having an effect on North Carolina voters. A poll released last week by Raleigh-based Public Policy Polling found that Gov. McCrory's approval rating stands at an all-time low: 39 percent. Dustin Ingalls, the group's assistant to the director, said the armor that seemed to protect McCrory from the impact of his policies appears to be chipping away.

"For a while, he had kind of a Teflon coating where his own approval ratings were holding up, even as the General Assembly for a long time was very unpopular, but now he's sinking pretty quickly as well," Ingalls said.

Immediately following the Public Policy Poll, McCrory's staff released an internal poll that showed his approval rating at 48 percent among voters, higher than Public Policy's poll results.

Reporting for this story by North Carolina News Connection in association with Media in the Public Interest. Media in the Public Interest is funded in part by Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation.

Stephanie Carson/Stephanie Carroll Carson, Public News Service - NC