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PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to investigate women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

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Efforts to Get NYers Back to Normal – and Ready for Next Sandy

Image: National Weather Service image of Sandy one year ago today. Advocates say the nonprofit sector has been making great strides helping New Yorkers return to normal, but they are concerned about next storm.
Image: National Weather Service image of Sandy one year ago today. Advocates say the nonprofit sector has been making great strides helping New Yorkers return to normal, but they are concerned about next storm.
October 25, 2013

NEW YORK – A year ago, New Yorkers were making ready for Superstorm Sandy – and now, helping agencies report major strides in assisting those who were affected by the storm.

Susan Dooha, executive director of the Center for the Independence of the Disabled in New York, says her group has been busy ever since Sandy roared ashore, helping people with disabilities to get back to life as normal.

"We've replaced ramps, wheelchairs, vans,” she says. “We've helped people go home from the hotels. We've connected people with mental health services to help them deal with the trauma they've experienced."

Dooha adds while many nonprofits and social service agencies have been proactive in responding to Sandy, she is concerned that the City of New York is still behind the curve, in its response to the last storm and advance planning for the next one.

Melba Torres was stuck on the eighth floor of New York City public housing during Superstorm Sandy. Today, she is concerned that the city has not done enough to prepare for the next major storm, such as having folks ready to run elevators.

"I have a motorized wheelchair, a power chair,” she says. “They weigh at least 500 to 600 pounds. I wish they would have a team of people that would be trained on how to mobilize people, if need be."

New York City says it's doing surveys of buildings used as shelters, although a judge has told the city that those buildings aren't accessible. And Dooha says the court will have the final say on that issue.

"We've been waiting now for seven months, because people with disabilities were left out of emergency planning and disaster response,” she adds. “We don't know when their decision will come, but we hope that it comes before the anniversary. "

She says her group continues to work on disaster relief.



Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NY