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PNS Daily Newscast - September 24 


Update: A second accuser emerges with misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavenaugh. Also on the Monday rundown: we will take you to a state where more than 60 thousand kids are chronically absent; and we will let you know why the rural digital divide can be a two-fold problem.

Daily Newscasts

Thanksgiving Begins a Deadly Time on Ohio's Roads

PHOTO: Law enforcement in Ohio are gearing up for one of the most dangerous times of the year on roadways. Photo credit: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
PHOTO: Law enforcement in Ohio are gearing up for one of the most dangerous times of the year on roadways. Photo credit: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
November 26, 2013

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Over the next several weeks, Ohio's roadways will be filled with travelers heading out to holiday festivities.

And law enforcement officials are encouraging drivers to plan ahead prior to celebrating.

Kristen Castle, a public information officer with the Ohio Department of Public Safety, says there is an increase in drunk driving accidents this time of the year.

"In 2011, there were 410 people killed in 379 alcohol-related crashes with 27 of those happening between Thanksgiving and New Year's," she points out.

Lt. Anne Ralston, a public affairs officer with the Ohio State Patrol, says one drink often leads to more, and impaired driving poses a risk to both your and others' safety.

"It only takes but a moment for an impaired driver to come left of center and hit an innocent driver," she advises.

Ralston says have a plan before leaving home – designate a non-drinking driver, take public transportation or a cab, or maybe stay overnight.

Law enforcement agencies will be increasing road patrols during the holiday season, looking for impaired drivers, as well as seat belt violators and those speeding.

Doug Scoles, state executive director for Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), says besides staying sober when driving, it's important to help family and friends who may be impaired find alternative ways of getting home.

"Nearly three-quarters of people have at one time or another seen somebody who has tried to drive home after drinking too much, and that's very disturbing,” he says. “But it is a fact of life that many people do try to drive home after they've been drinking too much."

MADD's annual Tie One On for Safety Campaign is under way, and it calls for drivers to display a red ribbon on their car to raise awareness about the dangers of drinking and driving.


Mary Kuhlman, Public News Service - OH