Newscasts

PNS Daily Newscast - July 16, 2018 


Ahead of his meeting with Putin, President Trump tells CBS News the European Union a foe. Also on the Monday rundown: calls in Congress to probe women miscarrying in ICE custody: concerns over a pre-existing conditions lawsuit; and Native Americans find ways to shift negative stereotypes.

Daily Newscasts

Finding Purpose in Life's Longer "Second Half"

PHOTO: Richard Leider, keynote speaker at this week's OSU Gerontology Conference, says having a purpose in life is key to being healthier, happier and aging well. Photo courtesy AARP.
PHOTO: Richard Leider, keynote speaker at this week's OSU Gerontology Conference, says having a purpose in life is key to being healthier, happier and aging well. Photo courtesy AARP.
April 4, 2014

CORVALLIS, Ore. – This week, several hundred medical professionals and caregivers got up to speed on the latest research on aging at the OSU Gerontology Conference.

Keynote speaker Richard Leider is a best-selling author who has spent three decades interviewing people age 65 and older. He says the points they've shared most often in those interviews are that they wish they'd been more reflective, and taken more risks - not financial or "daredevil" risks, but to find better "fits" in their careers and relationships.

And he recommends people at any age decide on a purpose.

"If you don't have a reason to get up in the morning, you don't live as long. You're not as happy, you're not as productive, and you're not as healthy," Leider explains. "Purpose is really your reason for getting up in the morning. And if that purpose is just about your own self and your own self-absorption, you don't do as well as when you connect and make a difference in other people's lives."

Leider, who is 70, is an executive coach and member of AARP's Life Reimagined Institute.

He says he hears often from people in their 50s and older that they thought they'd "have it all together" at this stage of life. Instead, they're dating again, or still working instead of retiring, or making room for grown kids to move back in. He tells people no matter what their situation, there is always room to rethink their options.

"It's really a basic life skill of the 21st century - to reflect, to connect with others, to explore," he says. "Push the 'pause' button and look at what the possibilities could be, even if you're stuck in some place at the moment."

Leider points out that in the year 1900, the average life expectancy was age 47. Now, women and men can expect to live into their 80s, prompting big changes in communities and workplaces.

Gerontology Conference participants also heard from experts in the fields of fitness, medication management, dementia, Medicare and more.

Chris Thomas, Public News Service - OR