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PNS Daily Newscast - September 21, 2018 


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It Won’t Take a Sandy-Sized Storm for Next Round of NH Flooding

PHOTO: It won't take a storm as large as Hurricane Sandy to cause serious coastal flooding in New Hampshire, according to a new report that confirms global warming's link to climate change. Photo credit: NASA/NOAA.
PHOTO: It won't take a storm as large as Hurricane Sandy to cause serious coastal flooding in New Hampshire, according to a new report that confirms global warming's link to climate change. Photo credit: NASA/NOAA.
May 7, 2014

CONCORD, N.H. - Increased costal and river flooding are two impacts the Granite State can expect, according to a new report that confirms the link between global warming and a changing climate.

People in New Hampshire and all along the East Coast have seen a 70 percent increase in the amount of precipitation during heavy weather events since 1958, said Kim Knowlton, co-deputy director of the Natural Resources Defense Council, senior scientist for its Health and Environment Program and a lead author of the Third National Climate Assessment. She said that's the biggest jump in the nation.

"But in the future, because of sea level rise, even lesser storms - storms not as intense as Sandy - will cause coastal flooding," Knowlton said.

The report suggested that New Hampshire and the Northeast are in for more hot weather. It projected temperatures from 2 to 4 degrees warmer in the next 20 to 30 years and, along with that, more extreme weather events.

Global warming remains a hot topic of debate in the Granite State, but Knowlton said there is no longer any significant level of doubt among scientists who study the climate.

"Based on the evidence, more than 97 percent of climate scientists have concluded that human-caused climate change is happening," Knowlton said.

From an economic perspective, the report warned of negative effects both for agriculture and fisheries in the Northeast.

The assessment comes from a federal advisory committee and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. It also was reviewed by members of the public and the National Academy of Sciences.

The report is online at globalchange.gov.

Mike Clifford, Public News Service - NH